The independent student newspaper of Goucher College

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Julianna Block

Julianna Block has 4 articles published.

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Juliana Block is a sophomore from San Francisco, California, and is a Communications and Media Studies major. She runs the social media part of the Q and is a writer as well. She participates in dance on campus and is an avid hammocker (when the weather is not too hot of course). One of her biggest loves is photography, so be sure to keep an eye out for her taking pictures! This is her second semester writing for the Q.

Hidden Places on Campus

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We all have places around campus that we enjoy to hide out in and be by ourselves. Many times, I don’t like to share where I am with friends when I’m in one of my hidden places, usually because I worry that they will take the spot from me. However, I want to share some of these spaces with you so you can experience the same joy that they have provided for me.

Go to the bottom floor of the library and sit at one of the desks by the windows. Now, be sure to use one of the big blue comfy chairs because who wants to sit in an uncomfortable chair? The bottom floor always seems to be one of the more quiet, non-quiet floor, floors. Easy to get work done, not many people can find you, and it’s fun to watch the rain/snow fall when it comes to that time of the year.

As mentioned in a previous article, there is a labyrinth between Bacon and the Chapel, right off of Van Meter. It’s secluded enough where, when you sit there, no one can find you. It’s a nice place to go to if you’re having a stressful day and just want to be surrounded by flowers and bushes.

My next favorite place is the swing down past Stimson and the South Lot. Keep going down the path, and you will be greeted by a swing in an open space. I swung on it during the first snowfall of the season and can honestly say that that may have been one of my happiest moments there. If you keep going down the path, there will be a path to your left and if you go through it, you will end up in the old equestrian field! Then, from there, you can relax in another favorite spot of mine.

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Goucher College Library. Photo Credit: The Chronicle of Higher Education VIA Google Images

My last favorite place is the old equestrian field. On any nice, or at least decently warm day, it’s a great place to lay out on a blanket and either do some art or bring homework that does not require the use of WiFi and be somewhat productive. Yes, many people may think “well, everyone knows about the old equestrian field.” However, there are certain parts that are hidden from people just walking around — you will have to find those on your own! One of these is further back, closer to the track field because there is less through traffic. You can even walk along a path that goes deeper into the woods and will lead you to a creek. Be sure to bring your hammock with you as well because it’s a great place to hammock.

So, here you have it, some of the spots on campus to hide away and be alone for a little bit. Yes, it is always good to go out and socialize, but it’s also a good idea to take some time for yourself. Why not spend this time out in nature in the old equestrian field? I did not share all of my favorite places; those will have to wait for another time.

A Rocky Horror Picture Show

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Picture Source: CelebMix.com

At least one hundred students were sitting outside of Merrick Lecture Hall Friday night, October 26th. Anticipation went through everyone as they waited for the doors to open, where they would be led into the world of Rocky Horror. “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” is a movie about Brad and Janet, who get stuck with a flat tire outside of transvestite scientist Dr. Frank-N-Furter’s mansion. They are taken for a wild ride in the mansion, where they meet an array of different characters including Rocky, a creation of Dr. Frank-N-Furter.

Goucher College’s rendition of the movie is done as a shadow cast, meaning cast members dress in lingerie and mouth out the words to the movie while the actual movie is projected onto a screen. Goucher has been doing this since the 1980’s, which explains why students get so excited when it gets close to Rocky weekend.

This year’s co-directors were seniors Chris Meyhew and Sophie Mezebish. Mezebish was a part of the cast her sophomore year, and then was assistant director her junior year. When asked why Rocky Horror is performed the way it is with a shadow cast, Mezebish said that because it’s such a cult classic, “people didn’t want to stray too far from the original movie,” hence why it is performed in front of it with actors mouthing words. Mezebish says that the reason why Goucher’s production is so unique is because it is so close to being a theatrical version but is still a shadow cast.

Zoe Gilmore and Jared Sumar played the loving couple Janet and Brad. Gilmore and Sumar are both sophomores, and it was both their first times being a part of the Rocky Horror cast. Gilmore decided to audition because she wanted to “step out of [her] comfort zone” as well as think about the different ways theater presents itself. She was in the theater department in high school but took freshman year of college off so she could scope out the theater scene here at Goucher. The rehearsals, meaning staying up past midnight to perfect scenes, was a great bonding experience for her as well as for the rest of the cast.

Jared Sumar, on the other hand, was not a total fan of the show at first. He decided to audition because his friend Chris said that he had to go because his name was on the audition list. Sumar enjoyed the fact that Meyhew and Mezebish made it a fun environment for the cast. Sumar wants to be involved again but most likely not until his senior year.

One of the most anticipated character reveals was Dr. Frank-N-Furter, played by Moe de la Viez, a senior here at Goucher. After a singing number, the spotlights moved to the top of Merrick, towards the entrance. Ensemble members held a white sheet, and with a sudden drop, De la Viez was revealed.

De la Viez has been a part of Rocky Horror for the past three years. She first watched the shadow cast before even knowing what she was getting herself into. She then portrayed Magenta her sophomore year, Eddie her junior year, and, of course, Frank her senior year. “Ok ya, everyone is going to be half naked” De la Viez said, describing it to be the culture of the show.

Having the show in Merrick lets there be much more audience participation throughout the show. As an audience member, you volunteer yourself to be crawled over, sat on, and even consensually made-out with by ensemble members. This kind of intimacy, however, is a one of a kind experience.

Too many details cannot be given, however, because then the surprise of the show will be ruined for all those who did not get the chance to see it this year. Thank you to this year’s cast for creating such a fun experience for all. If you did not get the chance to see it this year, get to Merrick even earlier next year.

First-Year Village: Too Much of a Bubble?

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Three years ago, the First Year Village was just an idea in the minds of students, faculty, staff, and administration. The first building of the Village, Pagliaro Selz Hall (commonly known as P-Selz), was up and running in fall of 2016. Only about a third of the first-years of 2016, the class of 2020, got to live in the fancy, new, hotel-like building. Pagliaro Selz is set up in a way where one must walk through all common rooms in order to get to their dorm room. The two buildings that followed, Trustees Hall and Fireside Hall, have been built in similar ways, although each have their own unique features. Some of these features include a dance studio and game room in Trustees Hall, and a demo kitchen (where students can film themselves cooking) in Fireside Hall. Now that the first-year village is complete, it is interesting to discover what the new first-years and their Residential Assistants (RAs) think about their new homes.

Many first-years have been asked about community in the First-Year Village, given that it is exclusive to one class of students. “It’s good because everyone knows each other, but at the same time, it feels a little bit isolating,” says resident Sal Suarez. When asked to explain how it felt isolating, he said that he believed the First-Year Village is a very big bubble and that the only upperclassmen he knows are those he has classes with. “I have absolutely no upperclassmen friends,” he says. He admits that it may be mostly due to it only being his first month of college, but he also feels that he could have already become friends with some of those upperclassmen were he not living in Fireside Hall.

For first-year Julia Gazzola, living in the First-Year Village has been a great experience so far. “I think living in the First-Year Village brings all [of us] together and gives us a sense of community,” which is what the the First-Year Village strives to do. Julia is a member of the Women’s Lacrosse team, so when asked if she felt isolated from upperclassmen, she said that for her, it did not feel very isolating because she gets to be on a team with women in all different class years. She understands, however, that if someone is not very involved, the First-Year Village could be isolating for them.

Interviewing RA Antonia Pettit (’20), provided an upperclassman perspective. Antonia was part of the first cohort to live in Pagliaro Selz back in the fall of 2016. She then became an RA in P-Selz last year, fall 2017, and is now an RA in Trustees Hall. “I loved it! It felt like a great community, although it seemed harder to get to know people my freshman year when first-years lived in [other dorms],” she says about her first year at Goucher. Since being an RA, she has observed many friendships developing in the First-Year Village halls and connections between first-years there developing sooner, even more so than through clubs and out-of-class activities.

The one flipside that Antonia touched on was that she felt that some first-years had not thought about the privilege that they have being able to live in such housing. As a result, their expectations after entering college and living in such beautiful dorms were skewed. Some anger towards Goucher has come from students who have had a chance to live in the First-Year Village and then have had to move into dorms such as Stimson Hall or Mary Fisher Hall, where the living situation is not nearly as high-end as in P-Selz.

Caption: The First Year Village.
Picture taken by Sarah Meehan for the Baltimore Sun

Evan Vann, a current first-year who lives in Fireside Hall, has enjoyed calling the First-Year Village his home. Like Julia, he believes it is a home with a good community and positive vibe. “It took a bit of time to get everyone comfortable with each other, but it’s starting to come together really well,” Evan said about his building and floor. He has not felt very isolated from upperclassmen because he knows that there are on-campus opportunities, such as clubs, to get out of the first-year bubble. Evan was one of the first freshmen interviewed to say that they have gotten to know a good number of upperclassmen without the help of being on an athletic team.

Overall, according to the freshmen interviewed, the First-Year Village has many great qualities and only a few negative ones. Most of them have enjoyed living there so far and believe that its proximity to the dining hall, Sports Recreation Center, and Academic Quad is well thought out. While they may not be able to live in the more historic dorms at Goucher and mix with upperclassmen that way, they do get to be a part of an important community environment in the newer buildings. While evaluating the First-Year Village now, after the opening of Fireside and Trustees Hall, was a must, The Quindecim will be checking back up on first-year impressions at the end of the year.

 

 

Movie Review: To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

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Photo Credit: IMDb.com

We all go through crushes. Since according to zodiac signs I am a Cancer, when I develop a crush, it can become quite an emotional experience for me. If only I had thought about writing a letter to all the boys who had unknowingly stolen my heart! “Liking” someone can be an overwhelming experience for some: constant butterflies in the stomach, nervous to be around the person they admire, and also being afraid to say how they feel due to fear of possible rejection. For others, having feelings for someone does not have this effect; it is just an extra amount of liking for them versus their “regular” friends. Lara Jean Covey (portrayed by Lana Condor), however, falls into the first category of people who have crushes.

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, originally a book written by author Jenny Han, was directed by female director Susan Johnson and premiered on August 17, 2018, on Netflix. The movie follows the life of a teenage Asian-American girl, named Lara Jean. Lara Jean wrote five letters to five different boys who she had developed a large crush on. Somehow, the letters get out and are sent to the five guys. Peter Kavinsky, the boy with the beautiful smile and starry eyes (portrayed by Noah Centino), addresses Lara Jean about his letter, which later, much, much later, turns into a happy ending for the both of them.

Throughout the film, Lara Jean is able to talk to the other four boys about the letters and all of them are understanding, well, except Josh, but that’s another story. Peter and Lara Jean decide to “date” to make his ex-girlfriend, Gen, jealous. Slowly but surely, and quite obviously, Lara Jean begins to develop real feelings for Peter, and little does she know that he feels the same way. She continues to tell herself and him that it is all fake due to not wanting to get hurt by him. After the big ski trip, Lara Jean and Peter make themselves official, but it only lasts about ten minutes because, of course, Gen ruins things when they get off the bus. SPOILER ALERT: In the end, Lara Jean and Peter end up together, and the audience and fans now must wait until it is confirmed that there will be a sequel to the movie to see how everything really ends.

This movie did a great job of casting the perfect actors for the roles that they had. Lana Condor fits the role of Lara Jean in every single way imaginable. She is sweet, kind, genuine, but also very strong and knows how to stand up for herself. Noah Centino, whose big debut was on the Freeform show The Fosters, had everyone’s heart throbbing throughout the movie. His talent shone throughout the movie, proving to fans that he knew all the right ways to play with the camera and his emotions. This movie felt very relatable for me, and I am sure others feel the same way. Twitter and Instagram went crazy once the movie was released on Netflix, and all actors immediately rose to fame (if they hadn’t already) due to the roles they had in the film. If this movie has taught me anything, it is to not be afraid to tell someone how you feel in-person, even if you don’t end up with a happy ending like Peter and Lara Jean had.

 

Edit on 9/17/18: The second sentence of the article was changed for clarity.

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