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Spring Break

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It’s nearing that time of the semester where students are getting ready for Spring Break 2018. Will they be going home? Are they going on a family trip somewhere close? Or do will they have the typical movie-like spring break and party it up on the coast of Florida? As we near our mid-semester break, I thought it would be nice to ask around and see what people will be up to, and maybe this will inspire others to do something similar!

“This year, I will be driving to Virginia with six friends and will be doing many hikes in Shenandoah National Park, as well as staying in an Airbnb.” -Noah Block (’21).

“Two friends and I are driving from Goucher to Nantucket Island to stay with my aunt, uncle, and grandmother. We’re planning on leaving our days open to adventure, like walking on the beach, no matter how cold it is, and exploring the island a little bit.” -Maddy Hawkes (’21).

“For Spring Break, I get to go home! I will be spending time with my family, and most excitingly, will be getting my wisdom teeth out.”- Lily Mikolajczyk (’21)

As you can see, many of us will be staying on the East Coast, especially those who have their homes out here. This spring break may even be the best one of your life so far. Why not make plans to go somewhere fun with friends? Or go on an adventure and visit some place you have never been before? Here are some cool ideas from people traveling outside the east coast for spring break:

“I am going back home to Northern California and a few friends and I are going to go on a road trip south to Santa Barbara. We are going to make various stops along the coast on our way down, and drive Pacific Coast Highway.” Antonia Pettit (’20).

“For spring break this year, I will be travelling to Los Angeles, California, with the Women’s Lacrosse team to play a few games, bond with my new teammates, and have a few fun adventures, one of which will be going to Six Flags.” Maya Bass (’21).

“I’m going to Fort Myers and will be visiting my grandfather and his girlfriend. While there, I plan on visiting many beaches, getting in as many hikes as possible, and exploring the area on my bike. Most importantly, I’m excited to be in the warm weather, and to be able to catch some rays and get a bit more tan for the second half of the semester.” –Amelia Meier (’21).

California seems like a popular place to venture to for break.The  Sunny coast, warmth, and great people, make it an overall good place to be in late March/ early April, especially when the east coast seems to be wanting to stay chilly and full of rain and snow. All in all, everyone tends to have a good spring break, no matter what they’re off to do. So make this one count!

By Juliana Block

News From the CDO: Calling ALL Students

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From the CDO

Time to SPRING FORWARD into planning your summer career experience!

Whether you are seeking an internship, summer job, or you’re a graduating senior looking for a full-time experience, it’s time to get started—opportunities await! And, the CDO is here to help every step of the way. Check-out tips and resources below for a couple of ways you could use Spring Break to your advantage!

5 Internship & Job Search Tips to Maximize Your Spring Break!

1. Articulate Your Interests & Skills  

  • Take time to identify (and write down) what you know so far about the skills and experiences you bring to your next career step.
  • Jot down what you know so far about the types of opportunities that might be of interest—duties, job titles, industries, organizations, locations.
  • If unsure about a career direction, complete the quick Traitify assessment for personality insights and recommended job titles to help get you started (available on the CDO homepage, when on the Goucher network).

2. Update Your Resume & Cover Letter

3. Develop a Plan

  • Develop a system to track where you have searched, who you’ve connected with, your applications, and follow-up/next steps to stay organized.
  • Develop a prospect list of organizations in which you are interested or want to learn more about, and review their websites for opportunities.
  • Check for internship and job openings on Goucher Recruit and through other websites (e.g. LinkedIn, Baltimore Collegetown Network, Google Jobs, Indeed, Idealist), professional associations, and personal contacts.
  • If interested in registering for academic credit for your internship experience, review the Internship Learning Agreement (ILA) on the CDO website. Remember that the Goucher Intern Fellowship funds are available to support summer internships! Find out more at http://www.goucher.edu/career-development-office/for-students/internships/. *If you’re still trying to get credit for a spring internship, note the deadline is March 30, 2018.

4. Network, network, network!

  • Start with who you know! Over break, ask your friends, family, and mentors questions about jobs, careers, experiences, and for suggestions of other contacts with whom they could connect you.
  • Conduct informational interviews to explore career fields and jobs by connecting with professionals in your field(s) of interest.
  • Use the Alumni Career Coaches tab in Goucher Recruit to search and message alumni who have volunteered to help YOU learn more about careers through their experiences and insights.
  • Create (or update) a LinkedIn profile to build your connections (alumni, faculty, staff, friends, family, colleagues, neighbors, teammates). Don’t forget to check-out the Jobs tab to search for opportunities!

5. Prepare for Interviews

  • Practice crafting and telling stories that showcase your skills and experiences.
  • Review commonly asked interview questions and prepare your answers.
  • For specific interviews, research the organization to which you are applying and spend time comparing your skills and qualifications to the job requirements.
  • Review CDO interview prep resources at http://www.goucher.edu/career-development-office/for-students/job-search/.

Don’t forget, the CDO is here to help and we look forward to connecting with you!

We meet with students year round, even over breaks, through scheduled appointments (on the CDO homepage @ www.goucher.edu/cdo) and drop-ins from 2pm-4pm Monday-Friday (just stop by!).

Follow us on social media- Facebook @GoucherCollegeCDO, and Twitter @CDOGoucher to keep up with all that’s happening at the CDO.

Feature Image Credit: Goucher College

Poetry as Community

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It is not so frequent an event that speakers are introduced as having created oceans. Oceans with “clear and clean water,” into which one can be submersed, “with no part left dry.”
On Thursday, February 15th, poets Airea D. Matthews and Ladan Osman visited Goucher for an evening of dinner, conversation, and, most importantly, poetry. They were the first in a series of poets whose visits will be sponsored by the Kratz Center for Creative Writing at Goucher College.
Typically, the Kratz Center sponsors one visiting writer event in the fall semester. For example, last semester Elizabeth Strout made a visit, and in previous years, other big names like Sherman Alexie, Seamus Heaney, and W.S. Merwin have come to Goucher. Then, in the spring semester, the Kratz Center sponsors a visiting writer to teach a course. This semester H.G. Carrillo is leading a fiction writing workshop. Goucher alumni Edgar Kunz is also visiting and teaching creative writing. In addition to these annually-run programs, however, the Kratz Center is also sponsoring something new this year—an “experiment,” in the words of Bill U’Ren, current Kratz Director and Goucher creative writing professor.
The Poetry Series is the experiment. Although U’Ren is the acting Kratz Director, the go-ahead for this experiment was given by last year’s co-directors Madison Smartt Bell and Elizabeth Spires. Meant to work in conjunction with this semester’s theme of “community,” the series involves creating several smaller events with visiting writers, rather than try to acquire big-ticket names. The series is also an attempt to organize a variety of readings which may not be the most traditional. For example, Matthews and Osman both employed mixed media presentations, using images along with their work. Future visiting poets include The Black Ladies Brunch Collective, a group of poets who work collaboratively.
Goucher poetry and peace studies professor Ailish Hopper was the curator of the series (and the author of the lovely introduction at the Thursday night event). As the curator, Hopper reached out to poets in the broader Baltimore community and asked for their help in creating the events. To create a pair for a joint reading, she would first contact one poet, and then ask whom that poet would like to read with, be it “a friend, or mentor or poetry-crush,” as Hopper put it. The poets were then asked what the phrase “poetry as community” meant to them. The focus, or subtitles, for each event, came from their answers to this question. Aptly, Hopper used a metaphor to describe her involvement as curator in this process: “I was like a sail on a sailboat, and all these winds came along to push the sail,” said Hopper, miming the movement of blowing winds to represent the various people who made the series possible.
At the event on Thursday, throughout the evening Matthews and Osman showed their friendship and respect for each other, each sharing stories about the other. At the end of the night, Hopper thanked both for their time, their poetry, and, ultimately, for their togetherness. Matthews and Osman laughed and looked at each other. “We really love each other,” said Matthews.

The Poetry Series has already been building connections between members of the poetry community. Of the 40-50 people at Thursday night event, there were a number of local poets, who teach in colleges, high schools, and afterschool programs. One outcome of this community-building is co-publicity and the creation of a master list of all the poetry events happening this spring. If you’re interested in attending poetry events on or off campus, check out the list below!
The final visiting poet of the semester, Rudy Francisco, who specializes in spoken word poetry, will lead a master class at Goucher in the morning but will perform in the evening at the DewMore Baltimore Poetry Festival. Hopper hopes that Goucher students connect with Francisco and make an effort to travel into the city for the festival.
Upcoming events at Goucher feature Poets Jenny Johnson and francine harris on March 29th, 7-9 in Batza Room and The Black Ladies Brunch Collective on Thursday, April 12th, 7-9, also in Batza.

On a final note, the Q is hoping to publish poems and spark poetry-centered conversation this semester in connection with the idea of poetry as community and poets as truth-tellers.
Go to an event and compose a response. Or be inspired in any other way. Write a poem… passionate, reflective, heart-breaking, fast, slow, rhyming, free verse…whatever your style is and wherever your heart is, just write.
Then send it into the world.

Why You Should Join Goucher Poll

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You know about Goucher Poll, right? As a Goucher student you’ve probably received a couple dozen emails from them each semester and dismissed them as spam, but I think working for Goucher Poll is a very enriching opportunity for any student at Goucher. It pays $9.25/hour and is very low maintenance. Training for the job is very minimal, and newcomers can learn everything they’ll need to know during a quick one hour and 15 minute training session. Once you actually start working the polls you’ll have multiple supervisors around you at all times that you can ask for help. You can even use your phone while you’re working, so long as you keep making poll calls. I don’t know any other job that lets you do that. Unlike most other jobs on campus, being employed with Goucher Poll doesn’t limit your ability to work additional jobs on campus. You can work a full time job on campus, as well as do some work with Goucher Poll on the side. Even if you’re working solely with Goucher Poll, the shifts are very flexible, meaning you can choose your own schedule. Each shift itself is four hours and 15 minutes long, and shifts take place from 4:45 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on weekdays and from 12:45 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on weekends. This means you can work only as many hours as your comfortable with, whether it’s four and a quarter hours per week or up to 20 hours per week.

I worked with Goucher Poll both last semester and this semester and it gave me more than just a paycheck. I personally have never enjoyed or been proficient at talking with people over the phone, especially strangers, but working at Goucher Poll has helped boost my public speaking skills and phone skills. After hundreds and hundreds of calls over multiple shifts, it stopped being so awkward for me to sit in an office for a few hours a week and ask random Maryland residents about their views and opinions over the phone.

“Even if you’re working solely with Goucher Poll, the shifts are very flexible, meaning you can choose your own schedule.” Photo Credit: Google Images

I’m not the only person who got a variety of useful experience from Goucher Poll. Zahir Mammadzada is a first year student at Goucher who has been working with Goucher Poll since the beginning of his first semester back in September and worked with Goucher Poll for its February poll as well. According to Zahir, working at Goucher Poll is “very interesting because (you) get the chance to meet so many different people from around this area and learn about them.” While Zahir “prefer(s) talking with people in person” he still enjoyed meeting so many Maryland residents through his work with the poll. When asked what he would like to tell other students about Goucher Poll, Zahir told me he would recommend it to anyone on campus. “It’s easy money; I mean, you get paid to just sit there and talk to people for a couple hours. It’s great.” Goucher Poll has closed for this semester but will return next semester and I hope you consider trying it out at least once during your time at Goucher.

It’s Time to Keep Our Schools Safe

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After the school shooting, students plan to demand legislation against gun violence
Photo: Google Images

On Wednesday, February 14th, 2018, a tragedy rocked the nation. In Parkland, Florida, suspect Nikolas Cruz entered the campus of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School armed with a loaded AR-15 semi-automatic rifle. Cruz began shooting within the freshman building, eventually discarding the weapon and ammunition in a stairwell, and exiting the school by blending in with fleeing students. Authorities arrested Cruz at 3:41 p.m. as he was walking down a residential street (Turkewitz, Mazzei, and Burch, 2018). It was later discovered that there were 17 victims from the school shooting, 4 more than the Columbine massacre in 1999 (Cameron, 2018). Despite the amount of shootings that have occurred in the past couple decades, very little has been done by government officials to ensure safety within the U.S educational system.

There are differing views on what can be done to protect those at educational institutions, but what cannot be disputed is the rise of gun violence in the United States and its effect on children. According to a study of World Health Organization data in the American Journal of Medicine, it has been found that 91 percent of children younger than 15 who were killed by gunfire lived in the United States (Cox and Rich, 2018). Even in instances where accidental gunshots were fired on campus grounds with no injuries, those affected still may have experienced trauma.

However, these incidents are not limited to the locations already affected. These events are real, and can happen anywhere, at anytime.

Not even a day after the Parkland, Florida school shooting, Loch Raven High School, 2.5 miles from Goucher College, went into lockdown due to a student bringing a pellet gun into the building. Apparently the student had shown the gun to another student, then discarded it. The offending student was charged as a juvenile for possessing a dangerous weapon on school property. Before the student was arrested, the school went into a lockdown for almost an hour, during which the students of the school hid in fear. Eighteen year old student Jordan Staten said, ‘“We were really scared. It was really awkward. We didn’t really know what to do, just [had to] sit there and wait. Whenever we heard a small noise or something, we’d freak out.”’ (Campbell, Knezevich, and Richman, 2018). No person should ever feel threatened while at a school, a place meant to be a safe space for learning and growth.

What can we do as a school to put a stop to these incidents?

As a community consisting of students, faculty, staff, parents, and alumni, Goucher College possesses an incredible capability to induce change. If the entirety of the school and it’s connections were to contact Maryland state and local representatives, and the representatives of their home-state, perhaps some form of legislation could be proposed to address the issue. Now is the time to voice your concerns. We can not afford to keep quiet.

To contact your federal, state and local officials, you can find their information at https://www.usa.gov/elected-officials.

Poetry as Community

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It is not so frequent an event that speakers are introduced as having created oceans. Oceans with “clear and clean water,” into which one can be submersed, “with no part left dry.”
On Thursday, February 15th, poets Airea D. Matthews and Ladan Osman visited Goucher for an evening of dinner, conversation, and, most importantly, poetry. They were the first in a series of poets whose visits will be sponsored by the Kratz Center for Creative Writing at Goucher College.

Airea D Matthews and Ladan Osman.
Photo Credit: Goucher College Events Calendar

Typically, the Kratz Center sponsors one visiting writer event in the fall semester. For example, last semester Elizabeth Strout made a visit, and in previous years, other big names like Sherman Alexie, Seamus Heaney, and W.S. Merwin have come to Goucher. Then, in the spring semester, the Kratz Center sponsors a visiting writer to teach a course. This semester H.G. Carrillo is leading a fiction writing workshop. Goucher alumni Edgar Kunz is also visiting and teaching creative writing. In addition to these annually-run programs, however, the Kratz Center is also sponsoring something new this year—an “experiment,” in the words of Bill U’Ren, current Kratz Director and Goucher creative writing professor.
The Poetry Series is the experiment. Although U’Ren is the acting Kratz Director, the go-ahead for this experiment was given by last year’s co-directors Madison Smartt Bell and Elizabeth Spires. Meant to work in conjunction with this semester’s theme of “community,” the series involves creating several smaller events with visiting writers, rather than try to acquire big-ticket names. The series is also an attempt to organize a variety of readings which may not be the most traditional. For example, Matthews and Osman both employed mixed media presentations, using images along with their work. Future visiting poets include The Black Ladies Brunch Collective, a group of poets who work collaboratively.
Goucher poetry and peace studies professor Ailish Hopper was the curator of the series (and the author of the lovely introduction at the Thursday night event). As the curator, Hopper reached out to poets in the broader Baltimore community and asked for their help in creating the events. To create a pair for a joint reading, she would first contact one poet, and then ask whom that poet would like to read with, be it “a friend, or mentor or poetry-crush,” as Hopper put it. The poets were then asked what the phrase “poetry as community” meant to them. The focus, or subtitles, for each event, came from their answers to this question. Aptly, Hopper used a metaphor to describe her involvement as curator in this process: “I was like a sail on a sailboat, and all these winds came along to push the sail,” said Hopper, miming the movement of blowing winds to represent the various people who made the series possible.
At the event on Thursday, throughout the evening Matthews and Osman showed their friendship and respect for each other, each sharing stories about the other. At the end of the night, Hopper thanked both for their time, their poetry, and, ultimately, for their togetherness. Matthews and Osman laughed and looked at each other. “We really love each other,” said Matthews.
The Poetry Series has already been building connections between members of the poetry community. Of the 40-50 people at Thursday night event, there were a number of local poets, who teach in colleges, high schools, and after school programs. One outcome of this community-building is co-publicity and the creation of a master list of all the poetry events happening this spring. If you’re interested in attending poetry events on or off campus, click here for events and bios of the poets.
The final visiting poet of the semester, Rudy Francisco, who specializes in spoken word poetry, will lead a master class at Goucher in the morning but will perform in the evening at the DewMore Baltimore Poetry Festival. Hopper hopes that Goucher students connect with Francisco and make an effort to travel into the city for the festival.
Upcoming events at Goucher feature Poets Jenny Johnson and francine harris on March 29th, 7-9 in Batza Room and The Black Ladies Brunch Collective on Thursday, April 12th, 7-9, also in Batza.

Poetry in Baltimore, Spring 2018

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Poetry Events in Baltimore This Semester

*for bios, below
3/4 Artivism Day
5pm, Impact Hub
3/8 ART Rising open mic, with featured performer TBA (Brought by Slammageddon Baltimore)
7:30pm, GLCCB, $5
3/29 Jenny Johnson* and francine j. Harris*
7pm, Batza Room in the Athenaeum, Goucher College
4/4 ART Rising open mic, with featured performer TBA (Brought by Slammageddon Baltimore)
7:30pm, GLCCB, $5
4/10 Terrance Hayes*
6pm, Mudd 26, Johns Hopkins University
4/11 Rigoberto Gonzales
5pm, Skylight Room in the Commons, UMBC
4/12 ART Rising open mic, with featured performer TBA (Brought by Slammageddon Baltimore)
7:30pm, GLCCB, $5
4/12 Black Ladies Brunch Collective*
7pm, Batza Room in the Athenaeum, Goucher College
4/19-21 DewMore Baltimore Youth Poetry Festival
4/21 Rudy Francisco,* featured performance
5/10 ART Rising open mic, with featured performer TBA (Brought by Slammageddon Baltimore)
7:30pm, GLCCB, $5

Chris August is a teacher and writer based out of Baltimore. He travels the world performing his work and has authored the collection Loving Instruments (Sargent Press, 2013). His poetry has been featured in Hyperlexia and the anthology From Page to Stage and Back Again. For over ten years, Chris August worked as a special educator in and around Baltimore city. During this time, he spent all of his free moments writing poetry and traveling the country to perform it. Over that time, he became involved in the national slam poetry community, which challenges writers to take their poetic works to the stage, competing with performance-ready versions of their best work. He has represented Baltimore, Washington, DC and Philadelphia at the National Poetry Slam and the Individual World Poetry slam, which he was lucky enough to win in 2011, after which he represented the United States at the Poetry World Cup in Paris, France.

Airea D. Matthews​’s first collection of poems, Simulacra, recipient of the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Award, has received praise from outlets including The New Yorker and The Washington Post. Her work has appeared in The Rumpus, Best American Poets 2015, American Poet, and elsewhere. She received the 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award and was awarded the Louis Untermeyer Scholarship in 2016 from Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. Ms. Matthews is working on her second poetry collection, under/class, which explores poverty. She is an assistant professor at Bryn Mawr College.

Somali-born poet and essayist Ladan Osman​ is the author of The Kitchen-Dweller’s Testimony, winner of
the Sillerman First Book Prize, and the chapbook Ordinary Heaven. Her next collection Exiles of Eden, a
work of poetry, photos, and experimental text, is forthcoming in 2019. Osman’s writing is a lyric and
exegetic response to problems of race, gender, displacement, and colonialism. Throughout her writing,
Osman is concerned with the question of testimony. Whose testimony is valid? Whose testimony is worth recording? Osman has received fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center, Cave Canem, and Luminarts Foundation, Michener Center for Writers Fellowship, among numerous other nominations. Osman’s writing and photographs have appeared in Columbia Poetry Review, Prairie Schooner, Roar, Rumpus, Transition, and Washington Square Review. She is a contributing culture editor for The Blueshift Journal. Osman currently lives in Brooklyn.

Jenny Johnson​ is the author of In Full Velvet, published by Sarabande Books in 2017. Her honors include a 2015 Whiting Award and a 2016-17 Hodder Fellowship at Princeton University. She has also received awards and scholarships from the Blue Mountain Center, Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, Virginia
Center for the Creative Arts, and Yaddo. Her poems have appeared in The New York Times, New England
Review, Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, and elsewhere. After earning a
BA/MT in English Education from the University of Virginia, she taught public school for several years in
San Francisco, and she spent ten summers on the staff of the UVA Young Writer’s Workshop. She earned
an MFA in Poetry from Warren Wilson College. She is a Contributing Editor at Waxwing Literary Journal. She teaches at the University of Pittsburgh and at the Rainier Writing Workshop, Pacific Lutheran University’s low-residency MFA program.

francine j. harris​ is originally from Detroit, Michigan, where she grew up in one of many neighborhoods
operating in economic limbo in the aftermath of the motor industry collapse. After high school, harris moved to Arizona and attended several community colleges part-time before earning scholarship to attend Arizona State University, where she earned a BA in English. harris spent the next several years working with grassroots organizing projects for community radio, social justice, and queer performing arts, while facilitating poetry workshops for young people and practicing visual art. harris moved back to Detroit in 2002. In 2011, she earned an MFA in Poetry from University of Michigan, where she was awarded a Zell Fellowship. harris is the author of allegiance (2012), a finalist for both the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and the PEN Open Book Award; and play dead (2016). Her poetry has appeared in many journals, including McSweeney’s, Ploughshares, Poetry, Meridian, Indiana Review, Callaloo, and Boston Review. A 2008 Cave Canem fellow, she has also won the 2014 Boston Review Annual Poetry Contest and was awarded a 2015 NEA fellowship. harris has taught creative writing at University of Michigan and Centre College in Danville, Kentucky, and she is currently writer in residence at Washington University in St. Louis.

Terrance Hayes​ is the author of Lighthead (Penguin 2010), winner of the 2010 National Book Award and finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His other books are Wind In a Box (Penguin 2006), Hip Logic (Penguin 2002), and Muscular Music (Tia Chucha Press, 1999). His honors include a Whiting Writers Award, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a United States Artists Zell Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a MacArthur Fellowship. How To Be Drawn (Penguin 2015), his most recent collection of poems, was a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award, the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award, and received the 2016 NAACP Image Award for Poetry. He is the current poetry editor at New York Times Magazine and has two forthcoming manuscripts: American Sonnets for My Past And Future Assassin (Penguin, 2018), and To Float In The Space Between: Drawings and Essays in Conversation with Etheridge Knight (Wave, 2018).

Rigoberto González​ is the author of 17 books of poetry and prose, most recently Unpeopled Eden, winner of the Lambda Literary Award and the Lenore Marshall Prize from the Academy of American Poets. Recipient of the Guggenheim, NEA, NYFA, and USA Rolón fellowships, he is currently professor of creative writing at the MFA program at Rutgers-Newark and on the board of trustees of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP). His book of criticism Pivotal Voices, Era of Transition: Toward a 21st Century Poetics is forthcoming from the University of Michigan Press Poets on Poetry Series.

Black Ladies Brunch Collective​:
Katy Richey​’s work has appeared in Rattle, Cincinnati Review, RHINO, The Offing and other journals. She
received an honorable mention for the Cave Canem Poetry Prize and was a finalist for Tupelo Press Snowbound Chapbook Poetry Award. She is a Cave Canem fellow and hosts the Sunday Kind of Love reading series open mic at Busboys and Poets in Washington D.C. Tafisha A. Edwards​ ​is the author of THE BLOODLET, winner of Phantom Books’ 2016 Breitling Chapbook Prize. Her work has appeared in The Offing, PHANTOM, Bodega Magazine, The Atlas Review, The Little Patuxent Review, and other print and online publications. She is a Cave Canem Graduate fellow and a graduate of UMD College Park’s Journalism school. Saida Agostini​ ​is a Cave Canem fellow, and lover of Prince. A queer Afro-Guyanese poet and social worker, Saida’s work has been featured in several publications. Anya Creightney​, a Cave Canem fellow, is originally from Albuquerque, New Mexico with roots in Kingston and Copenhagen. A poet, editor and coordinator, she is a Programs Specialist at the Poetry & Literature Center in the Library of Congress. Teri Ellen Cross Davis​ is a Cave Canem fellow and has received scholarships to attend the Virginia Center for Creative Arts and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. Her first collection HAINT was published in June, 2016 by Gival Press. Poet and journalist celeste doaks​ i​s the author of Cornrows and Cornfields,  (Wrecking Ball Press, UK) March 2015. Cornrows was listed as one of the Ten Best Books of 2015 by Beltway Quarterly Poetry. Her journalism has appeared in the Huffington Post, Village Voice, Time Out New York. Currently, she is the Visiting Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at University of Delaware.

Rudy Francisco’s​ spoken word art is an amalgamation of social critique, introspection, honesty and humor, using personal narratives to discuss the politics of race, class, gender and religion while simultaneously pinpointing and reinforcing the interconnected nature of human existence. He has conducted guest lectures and performances at countless colleges and universities across the nation. Francisco has shared stages with prominent artists such as Gladys Knight, Jordin Sparks, Musiq Soul Child, and Jill Scott. He is also the co-host of the largest poetry venue in San Diego, competes in domestic and international poetry slam competitions and had the honor of being nominated for an NAACP Image Award. Ultimately, Rudy’s goal is to continue to assist others in harnessing their creativity while cultivating his own. Rudy Francisco is the 2009 National Underground Poetry Slam Champion, 2010 Individual World Poetry Slam Champion and appeared on TV One’s “Verses and Flow”

A Brief Look at the History of Goucher’s Land

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In 1885, Goucher College was founded in Northern Baltimore as the Women’s College of Baltimore. It then was renamed Goucher College in 1910 to honor the contributions of Dr. John Goucher and his wife Mary Fisher Goucher. As early as 1914, the college sought to move out of Baltimore, due to the fact that “the character of the immediate neighborhood of the College was then beginning to change so rapidly.” The college purchased 421 acres of land in Towson in 1921. When the students first ventured to the Towson campus, the school newspaper described it as a visit where students “rambled for miles through the meadows, cornfields and woods that in a very few years will have been metamorphosed into the Academic Quadrangle, the Lake, Faculty Row, and everything else that one’s fondest dreams may suggest.”
The move was a time of great hope and anticipation, leading to a campaign where alumnae each raised $421 to fund the building of the new campus.

Goucher women visit the new campus in 1920s. Photo credit: Goucher College Archives

The land that became Goucher was originally owned by the Ridgely family as part of Hampton Estate. The Hampton Estate was one of the largest slave plantations in Maryland, before it was given by the family to their relatives, the Chew Family. The land then became the Epsom farm, which was still worked by slaves. When the college bought the land in Towson from the Chew family, it was stipulated in the deed that “that no part of said land or premises shall ever be leased, sold, transferred to or occupied by any person of the African Race; this provision, however, not to apply or include occupancy of servants, or employees of the owners of the premises.” Even after the sale, members of the college upheld a close neighborly relationship with the then owner of Hampton Estate, Captain Ridgely.
The move from Baltimore to Towson began in 1921 but was not completed until 1954, due to financial difficulties and building supply shortages during World War II. The 1950s was also a period during which white-flight was happening across the United States and in Baltimore, as white residents of cities moved out of the city center and into the suburbs and more people of color moved into the cities. In 1937, the Residential Security Map of Baltimore had been created, which is now known as a redlining map, meant to prevent the sale of property to people especially people or color and the poor who lived in certain geographic areas, particularly those in the inner-city. In this map “desirable” mostly white neighborhoods were marked as green, while “undesirable” neighborhoods with high lending risk were marked red. Through this effort and through neighborhood covenants, people of color were excluded from living in certain neighborhoods and were refused housing loans and insurance. This map was created by a number of real estate brokers as well as with help from Ivan McDougal, Professor of Economics and Sociology at Goucher College.
In summation, the history of the campus is far more complicated than is regularly acknowledged. This information is all available from the Goucher archives, which can be found online at http://blogs.goucher.edu/digitallibrary/.
If you are interested in learning more about this history or simply discussing what you know about the history and how it affects the college today, please contact me (Sophia Hancock at sohan001@mail.goucher.edu)! I am currently conducting a research project on the history of the campus as a part of my Environmental Studies capstone project.

SOPHIA HANCOCK

Club Chat: Fashion Club

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Goucher has a reputation for being a creative place, and for this installment of Club Chat, I talked to Elisabeth Wagner, ‘18, a co-president of Goucher’s fashion club.

Fashion Club hopes to “give students the opportunity to express themselves creatively through the means of fashion.” Photo Credit: Google Images

Q: What is your Club’s general purpose?
A: [The purpose] is to give students the opportunity to express themselves creatively through the means of fashion. Whether that’s sewing, embroidering, silk-screen printing we wanted to be able to give the ability and freedom to any student that came to us with a creative idea that they wanted to execute. We just got a bunch of silk-screen printing stuff, we have embroidery stuff, we have a few sewing machines…

Q: How does your club work structurally? Do you have meetings? A: Are you more event based?
We are trying to figure out a weekly meeting time, we don’t have a set meeting time yet.

Q: What gave you the idea to start the club?
A: I felt like they didn’t have anything fashion-oriented at Goucher. That’s something I’m interested in, and something I want to work professionally in. It was actually my friend who came up with the idea, and we got on top of it, and got funding for it.

Q: What are your plans this coming semester?
A: We have a few ideas! We just thought of something, where we want to give students the opportunity to donate old denim: pants, jackets, shorts… and let us rework it. We haven’t totally fleshed out whether it’s going to be free of cost, or if it will be a couple of dollars that will go into funding ourselves.

I wanted to do a fashion zine, since Goucher doesn’t have that and I think it’s a good way to explore personal expression and style on campus, which is obviously something that’s very prevalent and loud and I think that a lot of people at Goucher are very expressive. I think it would be nice to give them a platform recognizing it.

Q: Why should people participate in your club out of all the other options out there?
A: It’s a low stress environment to express yourself, and have the means to create different pieces. It’s about giving people the freedom of expression, and the means to do it.

And that’s that for this installment of club chat! Interested in having your organization featured in the next issue of the Q? Email me at firut001@mail.goucher.edu for your chance to be in the next edition!

A Sweet Treat

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The Scoop on an Ice Cream Stall in Baltimore Where Six Alumae/i and Students Happen to Work

Rae Walker, ‘17, and Hannah Speigelman, ‘15, at the Little Baby’s Ice Cream Stall. Photo Credit: Sophia Hancock

The bustling upscale “food hall” R. House is home to a surprising subset of the Goucher community. Tucked into a corner of the marketplace, Little Baby’s Ice Cream sells handmade, small batch ice cream with unique flavors, like Earl Gray Sriracha. The slim, brightly lit stall also happens to be the workplace of six former and current Goucher students.
Perhaps you’ve seen the ad. Sitting in front of a black backdrop, a person who appears to be made of a thick white substance stares outward, wide-eyed. He reaches up, scoops at the top of his head with a large spoon, brings the spoon to his mouth, and licks it. A faint lullaby plays as a slow voiceover begins his hypnotic monologue by saying, “there’s good reason for my glistening skin.” The camera zooms out. At the end of the clip, a cheerful logo for Little Baby’s Ice Cream appears—a smiling ice cream cone holding a spoon and an ice cream scooper. While perhaps it is not the most immediately appetizing, the popular youtube ad certainly gets your attention.
My knowledge of this ad campaign, however, did not lessen my surprise when Goucher alum Rae Walker (’17) informed me, somewhat offhandedly, that in addition to teaching full-time and getting a Master’s degree in education, he also scooped ice cream at a place called Little Baby’s.
Little Baby’s Ice Cream (LBIC) was founded in Philadelphia in 2011 and has expanded over the years to offer catering services in Southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Baltimore, and Washington, DC., with stalls located in D.C. and at Baltimore’s R. House. The founders believed that that ice cream could “bring people together.” Classic. It gets a little weirder, however, in the next part of their mission statement, which states that they see ice cream as “a unique opportunity to subvert people’s expectations,” a goal which they achieve in their ads, flavors, and business model.
“Little Baby’s is known for its weirdness,” said Hannah Spiegelman, ’15, the current manager of the Baltimore branch. Spiegelman worked in ice cream shops during the summers. At Goucher, she studied history, with a minor in art history. After graduating, she was determined to go down a path that involved museum work. However, after working in Special Collections at Goucher, she realized that it wasn’t the right path for right for her. In December 2016, when she saw on Instagram that the Little Baby’s Ice Cream (LBIC) stall at R. House was hiring, she applied. Within a year, she would become the manager herself.
“I realized that food is my greater passion,” said Spiegelman. “When I graduated…I thought that whatever I decided to do now [immediately after graduation] would be my life, but the more I talk to people, I see people who’ve completely changed what it is they’re doing. It’s okay not to know. People say ‘you’ve had four years to figure it out,’ when actually, no, I’ve had four years to become a completely different person and now I need to take time to process it.”

LBIC has kooky initiatives like a Pay It Forward Board through which you might pay for ice cream for a cancer survivor or a single dad, or for someone to do ten push-ups in the shop. Their biggest competitor in the area is The Charmery, probably due to the fact that, in addition to selling small-batch high-quality ice cream, both the Charmery and LBIC cater to eccentric tastes, with flavors like the Charmery’s Old Bay Seasoning and LBIC’s Pizza flavor.
When the photographer and I arrived at Little Baby’s for the interview with Spiegelman, Walker, who was manning the stall, handed us samples of every flavor that they had in stock. Earl Gray Sriracha was unexpectedly delicious and had a nice kick to it. After the interview, we walked away with scoops of Lychee Lemonade, which was very lemony and similar to sorbet, and Chocolate Mint Cookie, which was like eating Girl Scout Thin Mints in ice-cream form. Both were vegan flavors but certainly did not taste “vegan.”
LBIC’s unusual offerings attracted Spiegelman. “I hate boring ice cream flavors,” she said.

During Spiegelman’s time at LBIC, the number of Goucher-affiliated employs has steadily increased. Many of them work at LBIC in addition to having other positions and/or applying for or saving money for graduate school.
For example, Yael Ben Chaim, ‘16, started at LBIC in April 2017, while she had an AmeriCorps position working at the Maryland Farmers Market Association at a nearby location. She appreciated the combination of the office-based AmeriCorps job and the customer-service. Currently she works at MOMs Organic Market and she plans to go to graduate school for social work within the next two years. Yael’s favorite flavor is Plain. “It is simple, sweet and easy to enjoy,” she says. “It also mixes well with any other flavor on the menu!”
Rae works at LBIC at night and on the weekends. During the week, he is a Special Education teacher in a Baltimore public school, and is getting his master’s in education through Teach for America. Rae is also a fan of LBIC’s plain ice cream, but will willingly try any of the more unusual options.
Emily Abramson, ‘18, self-described avid tea drinker, started at LBIC in July 2017. She’s currently at Goucher in her final year for a Masters in Management. She also works part-time as a graduate assistant for the Office of Community-Based Learning (CBL) and is an intern for AARP Maryland’s state office, working to coordinate a statewide food drive in April. Other than all of that, she’s a freelance artist.
Emily’s favorite LBIC flavor would either be “Pumpkin Curry for the sweet/savory combo [and] the currants and cream because it reminds me of picking currants from my backyard when I was a little kid” or the “Cherry Hibiscus because the strong bitter flavor of the hibiscus counters the sweetness of the candied cherries perfectly.”
After she was hired at LBIC, Abramson encouraged Sophie Anger, ‘17, who was still a student and was looking for a weekend job, to apply. Anger started in September, while she was student teaching second grade at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School. Her favorite flavor is Coffee Toffee, because “I just love coffee ice cream, but I also loved our seasonal crushed candy cane, and chocolate ginger.”
Goucher student David Hernandez, ‘18, also works at LBIC. A history major, he is currently working on an archeological dig on campus, called the Epsom Project. His favorite flavors are a tie between Cherry Hibiscus because he’s “never tasted anything like it,” and Vegan Thai Iced Tea, which is made with delicious coconut cream.
This little ice cream stall has turned into a mini-Goucher community outside of Goucher. They work hard together and enthuse about their coworkers’ positivity, passion, and inspiring desires to make positive change in the world.

Rae Walker, ‘17 scoops ice cream at Little Baby’s Ice Cream when he’s not working as a Special Education teacher at Dr Carter G Woodson Elementary Middle School. Credit: Sophia Hancock

Spiegelman’s job as a manager, however, is not without its difficulties.
“R. House oozes that white men built it,” said Spiegelman. At the time that Spiegelman started at the newly-opened Baltimore branch, LBIC was partnered with Blk//Sugar, a bakery owned by Krystal Mack, who was the only woman and only black person working as a manager at R. House.
“I love the people that work here,” said Spiegelman. “It’s just the people upstairs…When I go to meetings with them, I’m the youngest, I’m the only woman…Everyone else is a white male.” Spiegelman laughed, drawing connections between her awareness of her management situation and her experiences at Goucher. “You don’t realize everything you’ve learned until you’re put into a situation, and then you’re like oh, that was very Goucher of me.”
A Goucher education can be taken in many directions. In addition to reflecting on how Goucher had opened her to a certain way of thinking, Spiegelman also emphasized how proud she was of all of her co-workers. “When you hear about alums, you just hear about alums in law firms, but the majority of graduated students are working in food service or something like that…[they are] working five jobs…and it’s all valid and awesome,” said Spiegelman. “There’s a lot of pressure to get salary jobs right out of school, and it would be great to have a salary job right now but there’s nothing wrong with working just because you love it. People should be celebrated for making it in this crazy world.”

In addition to managing Little Baby’s, Spiegelman works part-time in Goucher’s Special Collections. And on the side, she makes her own ice cream, based on historical art, events, and people, etc.! (Follow her on Instagram: @asweethistory). Her favorite LBIC flavor is Maryland BBQ because “it is unexpectedly delicious” and she hopes to go to graduate school for food studies in the fall.

A Little Extra
As part of the interviews, I asked alums to write what they appreciated about their co-workers. They all had many lovely things to say. Emily Abramson’s comments were so sweet and individualized, however, that it was impossible to resist publishing them all.

From Emily, on her co-workers:
Hannah: A sweet boss and always someone that is there for me. Both of us have this unique quality in which it can take one of us upwards of half an hour to tell a story, so there’s never a quiet moment when we’re working together.
Yael: An angel, and one of the sweetest people in the world. She brings out the goofy side in me, and we’ve heard reports from other R House staff that they can sometimes hear us laughing from across the building.
Efehi: I love Efehi for many many reasons, one of which being that she’s the only one that can keep up with me when I’m dancing in the stall.
Rae: Rae and I always manage to make each other laugh so hard we wheeze when we work together.
David: David’s smile always charms the older gay men into giving us lots of tips, which I appreciate. He’s so so sweet, and incredibly understanding.
Sophie: Through thick and thin, Sophie is a dear friend and a great person to work with. We spend slow days at work experimenting with weird flavor combinations and laughing at ridiculous college stories.
Zac: An impeccable fashion sense and such a down to earth dude.

Spiegelman also happily made it clear in her interview that Goucher students who visit Little Baby’s (while she is the manager, at least) will receive a discount.

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