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Sustainability Coordinator Position Approved

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In the fall of the 2016-2017 school year, Matt Harmin was hired as the sustainability coordinator. As sustainability coordinator, his main role was to facilitate environmental action on campus, serve as a resource person, and collect data for annual reports. Harmin was paid an annual salary in the low $30,000 range, using funding from the Green Fund fee.

Now that Matt Harmin is no longer at Goucher, the Goucher Environmental Sustainability Advisory Council (GESAC) has been discussing whether or not to retain the position. Part of this discussion includes determining whether or not it is ethical to pay a salary from a fund created through student fees, as it may not be feasible as a long term source of funding. The newly formed student organization of environmental clubs, the Goucher Green Coalition, planned to petition for the position to continue, but before they could send out their petition, the position was approved by the administration and sent to be reviewed by Human Resources.

It remains a question, however, whether or not the coordinator will be paid through the Green Fund. In response to this, Grosso stated, “I think that I speak for a lot of students when I say that I would vastly prefer a Sustainability Coordinator paid via the Green Fund than no coordinator at all,” in an email conversation. She envisions the sustainability coordinator as essential in connecting environmental clubs and spearheading environmental action on campus.

For the year and a half that Matt Harmin was Goucher’s first sustainability coordinator, he chaired GESAC, acquired grant funds to support Energy Dashboard system, and worked with students on Green Fund projects, among other responsibilities. He also organized events like mushroom hunting, and instated a discount for students who brought their own bottle or mug to the dining halls.

Having a staff position entirely dedicated to sustainability also makes Goucher’s commitment to the environment more evident. The petition leverages this, bringing up the fact that Goucher is a member of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, and that President Bowen has signed the President’s Climate Consortium, and positing that hiring a sustainability coordinator will help Goucher uphold its commitment to these agreements.

Another reason for hiring a sustainability coordinator is for increased continuity of leadership around environmental issues. However, the salary may be detrimental to this proposed goal. Sophia Hancock, ’18, expressed concern that if a coordinator is paid a salary of around $30,000, they won’t stick around. How long would it be, she wondered, before they found a higher-salary position? If the sustainability coordinator were only in the position for a couple years, they would not be at Goucher longer than most of the student population. While the question of continuity may remain difficult to answer, if the position is renewed, Grosso is considering applying for it after graduation, and she encourages other students to do so as well.

To find out more about the Green Fund, click here.

If you’re interested reading a full job description for the sustainability coordinator, or in finding out more about the Goucher Green Coalition, contact Rachel Grosso at ragro001@mail.goucher.edu.

Environmental Clubs Create Coalition

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On Tuesday March 27th, a group of student leaders met to discuss the future of environmental action on Goucher’s campus. The group, currently named the Goucher Green Coalition (GGC), hopes to enact greater positive change through increased connectivity and communication among environmental clubs on campus. Because some of the clubs involved rely heavily on volunteers, such as Food Recovery Network, one goal of GGC will be to create a network through which clubs can ask for volunteers. The coalition also hopes to organize its own events, such as an Earth Day Campus Clean up on April 18th, and a Call-A-Thon for students to contact their representatives.

Rachel Grosso, ’18, was inspired to organize the coalition after attending the first annual Baltimore Student Environmental Conference, which brought together student leaders of environmental organizations from colleges and universities in Baltimore. Johns Hopkins and Loyola University both have an umbrella group that coordinates collaboration among environmental clubs, and this organizational structure inspired Grosso to start something similar at Goucher. Grosso noted that since Goucher Energy Action Revolution club, or GEAR, dissolved 3 or 4 years ago, Goucher has not had a “strong environmental presence,” which is something she hopes to change. As this is her final semester at Goucher, however, the continuance of GGC will rely on other students.

To form the group, Grosso made a list of people she had spoken with at the conference and looked for related clubs on the club page on Goucher’s website. As she began talking about her plan, more students became interested who were not already involved in a particular environmental group.

In this first meeting, which only lasted a half hour, the GGC discussed their purpose, vision, and concrete goals. Most of the meeting was spent discussing a petition to hire a new sustainability coordinator, but club leaders also made announcements about what they are working on.

Food Recovery Network (FRN) leader Allie Sklarew, ’17, stated that FRN will be hosting a Move Out for Hunger event at the end of the semester. This event encourages students to donate any leftover non-perishable food they have in their dorm rooms to be delivered to food banks, homeless shelters, and/or other organizations fighting hunger.

In a similar vein, Brett Rapkin-Citrenbaum, ’17, announced plans organize the “free store” at the end of the semester. A large project, the end-of-the-semester Free Store involves maintaining an on-campus space where students can bring items that they no longer want or need (clothing, books, electronics, etc.). The items brought to the Free Store can then be taken up by other students, or, if they remain in the “store” at the very end of the semester, be delivered to Goodwill. While there is a Free Store throughout the semester located on the top floor of Mary Fisher between Hooper and Dulaney, the Free Store at the end of the semester is much larger.

Because this Free Store project only operates at the end of the semester, unlike FRN, there is no consistent pool of student volunteers to pull from. For this reason, the Free Store exemplifies exactly the kind of project for which an organization like the Goucher Green Coalition can be helpful.

The Goucher Green Coalition had their second meeting on Monday, April 2nd.

If you’re interested in finding out more about the Goucher Green Coalition, contact Rachel Grosso at ragro001@mail.goucher.edu. And if you’d like to volunteer to help with the end-of-the-semester Free Store, contact Brett Rapkin-Citrenbaum, at brrap002@mail.goucher.edu.

Featured Image: The Second Meeting of Goucher Green Coalition. Photo Credit: Rachel Grosso

Goucher Students Published in Charm City Stories

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On Friday, April 6th, Charm City Stories, Baltimore’s first student literary and art magazine of mental and physical health, will release its first publication. The magazine will feature the work of at least four Goucher students: Donché Golder, Natasha Hubatsek, Michelle Cheifetz, and Ruth Diaz-Rivera.

Print copies of the free publication will be released at Johns Hopkins University at a gallery exhibition in the Second Decade Society Room of the Center for Visual Arts from 7-9pm. The publication will also be available online at charmcitystories.com.

Charm City stories is inspired by the field of Narrative Medicine, the idea that effective and humane healthcare relies on the ability to interpret and be moved by the stories of others. The first annual publication builds on the collaboration of writing departments at Johns Hopkins, Goucher, Loyola, UMBC, University of Maryland College Park, and Morgan University. The first annual publication of the free magazine is sponsored by the Mellon Arts Innovation grant from Johns Hopkins University.

One day, Goucher writing professor Katherine Cottle asked her writing students to submit at least one piece for publication before they left class, and this was the assignment that led to the publication in Charm City Stories for Donché Golder. Golder, ’18, submitted a poem, entitled “This is what you need to hear, and why.”

Through his poem, Golder explores themes of healing and accountability. “Without beating around the bush,” he said, “the poem is about sexual assault. The bulk of the poem addresses the agony of those who have been effected by sexual violence/abuse and the last four lines drive the point home: ‘I could have inserted a name, but this poem isn’t for one person./ This poem is directed at “you,” whoever “you” may be,/ wherever “you” are, for whatever “you” have done wrong./ This is what you need to hear, and this is why.’”

Golder, a 4th year English Major, Professional Writing minor, was inspired to submit for Charm City Stories because, he admitted, he hadn’t been published since seventh grade. “I’ve come a long way since then and I think it shows in my work,” he said.

To find out more, visit charmcitystories.com.

Track and Field Landmark Conference

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On Saturday, February 24th, the Gophers competed in the Landmark Conference at the indoor track and field Landmark Conference championship. first-year Brian Sullivan, from the men’s team, came in ninth place in the 60-meter dash and tenth place in the 200-meter dash with respective times of 7.42 and 24.03 (seconds). On the field, sophomore Darby Bauer finished ninth in the weight throw, launching the weight a whopping 39’8.50”.
Sophomore Natalie Kent, finishing second in the shot put, scored the highest for the women’s team, leading them to a sixth place finish. Sophomore Taylor Gunter placed fourth in the shot put with respective tosses of 35’ 9.25” and 34’ 11.75”. Gunter also placed third in the weight throw with an effort of 44’ 6.25”. Sophomore Gabby Blazek made third place in the pole vault clearing 9’ 5.75”. On the track, sophomores Michell Wolinsky and Anna Galina and first-years Kennedy Lowery and Enid Swatson took third in the 4×200 meter relay with a time of 1:55.24. Gallina had high finishes, placing seventh in the 200-meter dash (28.18) and tenth in the 400-meter dash (1:07.48). In the distance medley relay, first-years Jennifer Alves, Enid Swatson, and Isabel Srour and sophomore Victoria Wheeler took sixth place with Alves, Swatson, and Wheeler running distances they have never run on the track.
The indoor track team is saying goodbyes to seniors Brandon Creed and Katie Thompson. Creed was named to the Landmark Conference All-Sportsmanship Team along with sophomore Anna Gallina. Goucher will miss the heck out of these folks.
On Saturday, March 24th, the Gophers will host the Goucher Classic Invitational. Come support the Gophers on the track, because, as Coach John Caslin always says, “it’s a great day to be a Gopher!”

Featured Image: Landmark Conference Logo. Photo Credit: Goucher College Website

ISABEL SROUR

Goodbye (for now) to Athletics Director Geoff Miller

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The Gophers and Goucher College are saying a tearful goodbye to Director of Athletics Geoffrey Miller after gracing Goucher with his love and hard work for twenty two years. Not only was dear Mr. Miller the Director of Athletics. Additionally, Mr. Miller graced Goucher as a professor in Goucher’s graduate school’s M.Ed. program, concentrating in sports administration and leadership. Mr. Miller’s previous work had him in Washington College working as the Director of Athletics for seven years. Thankfully, he decided to come to Goucher in 1994 to serve as the Director of Athletics in hopes of “building of an athletic program” for the students and community here at Goucher.
During his time at Goucher, Mr. Miller has been a force of change, overseeing the addition of the track, pavilion and turf field, and the conversion of classrooms into the weight rooms in the SRC. Mr. Miller also brought Goucher to the Landmark Conference, which he helped to create. While making changes, Mr. Miller also noted changes around him, including the many curriculum changes. According to Mr. Miller, “we aren’t salesmen, but we’re trying to sell the school to our students.” To Mr. Miller, change is for the better.
As for the future of Goucher, Miller hopes that the Gophers bring home the metaphorical gold, winning more conference championships and gaining more national recognition for grades. After more then twenty years of work, Geoffrey Miller will be truly missed by the faculty and the students for his friendly and kind-hearted attitude. And although this is a goodbye, it’s not goodbye forever, as Mr. Miller plans to keep in touch with Goucher’s teams. From all of us in the Goucher Community, bon voyage and may the next step in your life’s journey be fruitful and pleasant.

Featured Image: Geoff Miller, with his daughter Sara, on Beldon Field in 2011. Photo Credit: WordPress blog by Billy Weiss, ‘11

ISABEL SROUR

The Poetry Corner

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This semester, the Kratz Center for Creative Writing is sponsoring a series of events entitled “Poetry as Community.” In conjunction with this theme, the Q has asked student poets to write about poets whose work they appreciate, to send in along with their own poems.

Here is Goucher poet Donché Golder, ’18, on poets who he considers to be great:

Lady Ise 877-?940

Lady Ise is a Japanese poet who wrote her work and the ‘Waka’  form. The term ‘Waka’ refers to poetry written in a 5-7-5-7-7 metre, (5-7-5 look familiar?) although it was once an all encompassing word form poetry in Japan. Lady Ise was the premiere female poet in Kokinwakashū, the first anthology of waka commissioned by Emperor Daigo. She is also, alongside Ono no Komachi, one of the premiere female poets in the Japanese early classical canon. Her works on the season are very beautiful and when translated are among some of my favorites.

*Note: Waka when translated into English or other languages may not always retain their metre.

ISE SHŪ 37 (*Ise Shū is the poetic memoirs of Lady Ise)

yo ni sakanu        Never blooming in this world,
mono ni ariseba    Were it such a thing,
sakurabana        A cherry blossom;
Fito ni amaneku    To all and sundry
tugezaramasi wo     It would be better not, to announce it so!

KOKINWAKASHŪ XVIII: 1000 (located in the 18th book of the kokinwahashū, the 1,000th waka chronologically.)

yamagaFa no        A mountain brook
oto ni nomi kiku    Babbling is all I hear
momosiki wo        Over the many-stoned palace
mi wo Faya nagara    Swift as the current would I return to the days
miru yosi mo gana     I saw it-how I wish it could be so!

 

Fujiwara No Teika 1162-1241

Like Lady Ise above, Fujiwara No Teika (Teika), was a renowned Japanese poet who wrote in the waka form. His works were inspired by the occurrences in his life, and show fluctuations due to his status at court and his physical health. Nonetheless he is still an inspiration to me as a poet. His works are recorded in the Senzaishū and the Shinkokinshū.

SENZAISHŪ V: 355

sigure yuku        Touched by drizzling rain,
yomo no kozuwe no    All around, the treetops
iro yori mo        With their colours say
aki Fa yuFube no    Autumn in evening is
kaFaru narikeri     A time of change, indeed.

SHINKOKINSHŪ VIII: 788

tamayura no        Fleeting, indeed, are
tsuyu mo namida mo    Dew and tear drops, both
todomarazu        Unceasing;
nakibito koru        She loved
yado no aki kaze     This house, where Autumn winds blow now.

 

Lucille Clifton 1936-2010

Lucille Clifton was an African American Poet born in New York City.  Since it isn’t my job to give you a full chronicle of her life, I’ll keep it brief. Clifton’s work focused on the African American experience, both as an African American woman and as a member of an African American family.  She was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for her works Good Woman: Poems and a Memoir, 1969-1980, and Next: New Poems, which were both published in 1987. Clifton was also Poet Laureate of Baltimore City (My hometown). All in all, Clifton’s work speaks to me as an African American and makes me aspire to write as well as she did.

homage to my hips

these hips are big hips

they need space to

move around in.

they don’t fit into little

petty places. these hips

are free hips.

they don’t like to be held back.

these hips have never been enslaved,

they go where they want to go

they do what they want to do.

these hips are mighty hips.

these hips are magic hips.

i have known them

to put a spell on a man and

spin him like a top!

 

my dream about being white

hey music and

me

only white,

hair a flutter of

fall leaves

circling my perfect

line of a nose,

no lips,

no behind, hey

white me

and i’m wearing

white history

but there’s no future

in those clothes

so i take them off and

wake up

dancing.

 

Other poets Donché recommends:

Featured Image:  Lucille Clifton. Credit: The Poetry Foundation

Goucher Poets: Donché Golder

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As a part of this semester’s theme of community, the Kratz Center for Creative writing is sponsoring a series called “Poetry as Community,” bringing local poets to campus to build new connections. To add to this conversation of poetry as a means of creating community, the Q is asking student poets to share their poems. To start off this series, here are a couple poems from Donché Golder, ‘18.
In his words, Donché Golder is an aspiring poet and a native of Baltimore City. He’s a 4th year English Major, Professional Writing Minor who plays chess and reads manga in between stressing over whether he will be employable after graduation.

To read about poets that inspire Donché, click here.

Hallmark Scene

Look at it
The fire place lit
Gifts sit idle
Under the tree
Children sit around
Smiling
Crying
The golden retriever smiles
At the feet of father
His pipe lit
Mother stands behind
The red armchair
In front of the window
Where we witness
Another White Christmas

Thanks for another
Noninclusive representation
Of a capitalistic holiday

 

Lover’s Exchange (List of Sedoka: Read from right to left)

Shu
you reaches this When
and vanished have will sun the
.contrast in pale will moon the

Omaa
gently rest words Your
.heart my is that bed the on
.later arrive will response My

Shu
.love received have I
draws note the on fragrance The
.you to closer ever me

Omaa
,touched truly am I
.away far stay must you but
.die you’ll ,you sees father If

Shu
.wrath his seen have I
,armies vast his seen have I
.beauty seen have too I but

Omaa
you ask not do I
,here emotions your still to
.letters these for yearn I but

Shu
letters the like And
,you before appear will I
.sun black the of night the on

 

יעל

The monster sits in the dark

and peers deep into the truth.

 

He looks back at them,

lustful incarnations in the cradle of time.

 

He recalls יעל.

Her curly brown locks,

and the way she didn’t hesitate

to embrace him.

 

His guard let down.

Her skin smiling, elephant tusk

wrapped around a child of Adama.

She, born in gods image,

bore into him.

 

He drank of her milk.

Secure in her tent,

he fell asleep.

 

She stared into the eyes of a beast

whose true existence could not be fathomed

by weaker men;

men tired from wars: internal and external.

They fade.

 

The monster sits in the dark

retells the truth of a woman of light.

 

 

 

Featured Image: Poetry Broadside created by Donché Golder.

Meet the Band: Cries for Help

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How much do you know about the Goucher music scene? Do you know about any of the bands here at Goucher? A few days ago, I had the opportunity to interview John Eng-Wong to talk about his band Cries for Help and what direction he wants to take the group in. The band Cries for Help was formed one night in early September of 2017, only a single day before their first performance at one of Goucher’s many open mic nights. Current band members include Goucher freshman John Eng-Wong as lead guitarist and singer, Goucher freshman Erica Manson on piano, Goucher freshman Andrew Harper on drums, and Goucher sophomore Dylan Samuel on bass and rhythm guitar. Frontman John met pianist Erica in a Goucher music class, and almost immediately afterward, the two decided to pursue music together in a band. Not too long afterwards, drummer Andrew and bassist Dylan both found the band through the Independent Music Club here at Goucher. Since then, Cries for Help has built up a repertoire of 9 finished songs and have played over a half dozen shows together as a full group.
In terms of music genre, Cries for Help considers themselves to be a punk band with emo undertones. The band’s major musical influences include the Obsessives, Slaughter Beach, Dog, the Hotelier, the Smiths, Alex G, and Frank Ocean. Lead guitarist John Eng-Wong says he hopes that band will eventually get into the Philadelphia emo scene. According to John, Cries for Help also plans to do some studio work over the summer to create recordings for all their songs and potentially start releasing albums. Currently, the band manages to hold full band practices two to three times a week while crammed in a single on the third floor of Probst. When I asked John where he draws inspiration from as he writes his lyrics and music, he told me “I want to write things that are hard for me, both as an artist and as a human being.” There is a massive difference between a piece of music that is hard to play because of tempo or note complexity and a piece of music that is hard to play because of its emotional impact or personal connection to the musician. Some songs can be both and some songs can be neither. John then explained to me how playing and creating music allowed him to express emotions and communicate ideas in ways that words could not by themselves. As both an artist and musician myself, I could not agree more.
Cries for Help is playing a show in Baltimore on March 31st at a venue called Big Red Booking with several other local artists, including My Heart, My Anchor, At Face Value, and Heart for Hire. I would highly recommend taking advantage of the opportunity to watch these outstanding musicians at work and get a taste of the Baltimore music scene. Follow the band’s Instagram at @criesforhelp or check out John’s personal Bandcamp at https://johneng-wong.bandcamp.com/.

Club Chat: Anime Club

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Some clubs are about working up a sweat, and some are about creating new things. This week, let’s look at an organization that’s all about relaxing and hanging out with people who share the same kind of interests: Goucher’s own Anime and Animation Club. I talked to Katelyn Pringle (‘18) president and founder.

What is your club’s general purpose?

We want to bring together anime and animation enthusiasts on campus, so we can discuss current trends, recommend stuff to each other, and sometimes go out and attend conventions to try and support the industry.

How do you work structurally?

At the beginning of every year, everyone gets to make three suggestions, and we put them into a drawing pile. So it’s completely random. Every meeting we watch two anime – not counting the one we follow throughout the semester- and one cartoon. Last week we watched the very first episode of Tom and Jerry.

We meet on Sundays at noon. It’s usually an after brunch deal. We meet in Ath 322.

What gave you the idea too start the club?

When I was in high school, I was president of the anime club. I thought there was going to be one here- and there was- but it was disbanded. I decided I could be the president – I did it before.

What are your plans this coming semester?

We are watching a show throughout the semester: Mononoke, which is a horror anthology. It’s really cool! It’s got some great, trippy animation. We are also going to go to Universal FanCon, which is a Baltimore convention in April. I was hoping to have one last movie screening, but I’m not sure if that will happen. We had one last semester, it was for the cartoon network mini series Over the Garden Wall.

Why should people join?

There’s a lot of different organizations on campus: about doing good things and making the world a better place, and that’s great and fantastic, but sometimes you just want to watch some cartoons. And sometimes you just want to meet other people who watch them too. Have you ever met an anime fan? They’re insane: we need each other.

And that’s that for this installment of club chat! Interested in having your organization featured in the next issue of the Q? Email me at firut001@mail.goucher.edu for your chance to be in the next edition!

Feature Image Credit: Google Images

Goucher Problem #∞ (Though, Not Only Goucher’s Fault)

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Upon putting together admission packets, scrolling through Goucher’s website and looking through courses offered, time and time again, Goucher seems to promote the Baltimore Student Exchange Program. For those who are not familiar with the exchange program, it is a way for students to take classes at outside universities if Goucher, or the other colleges part of the program, do not provide that class or language at the home institution. (And to be honest, that is a big reason Goucher appealed to me.)

Now comes into play why I have issues with our Baltimore Student Exchange Program. I wanted to take Chinese for my language requirement, a course no longer offered at Goucher, but I was not allowed to take it at a different institution. Goucher’s language requirement is three semesters for any language if they are to start as a beginner – and it is always best to start this requirement early, especially considering all of the other requirements we students now need to complete (cough, CPEs, cough). However, upon beginning the process of choosing classes, I came upon a roadblock. When I asked about taking Chinese at another institution, the answer I got was conflicting.

For starters, during the summer when Goucher hosted their YouTube live sessions for incoming freshman, I had asked: “How can I take Chinese at another school so I can fulfill my requirement?” And the answer I received was not encouraging and helpful, rather it was, in some ways, meant to deter me. The answer I got was along the lines of “Freshman are not allowed to study at a different institution because we want our freshman to become acquainted with our campus.” Now, the answer is a great one in theory. But the problem with it is simple, how much time would I honestly be spending at the other institution? I’d still be living at Goucher, taking three out of my four classes at Goucher, getting an on-campus job at Goucher, and spending most of my time here. So why was that the answer I got?

That aside, I decided to push ahead and see if I could take Chinese during my second semester. I started to research the system, came up with a class that had a boatload of empty seats and found one that worked great with my schedule. With everything researched I submitted my application and was pretty sure that I was going to be allowed to take the class. I mean the person running the program said in mundane terms, “You are most likely going to get in because it is a language requirement.” However almost half a month later right before finals were starting, I got an email telling me I was not accepted. The reason: there were not enough seats.

Now granted that part was not Goucher’s fault. Rather, it was the other institutions who claimed, when I called them, that there was no availability in the classes even though there was still a good deal more open seats (almost ten). However, with that said, there are still significant problems with Goucher and the inter-collegiate system.

If Goucher is going to be a part of and actively promote students’ abilities to study at partnering institutions, shouldn’t all students be allowed to take part? Goucher is at no point not benefiting if a student is only taking one course at a different institution. Moreover, even if they were not profiting, the pros far outweigh the cons. For us students, there would be more doors opened for educational opportunities, Goucher could be getting other students from those nearby institutions, and the students from Goucher would still be living and paying Goucher for their education due to them still being the home institution. However, if Goucher College is worried that allowing their students to study at colleges such as Towson University, Loyola Maryland or Johns Hopkins University would result in even more students transferring, well then, that is less a reflection of the program itself and more how Goucher deals with their academics.

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