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Get Into Goucher April 13th 2018

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Click on the photos above to see more photos of GiG.

On a lucky Friday April 13th, Goucher Students took to the Great Lawn, enjoying a community lunch, performances by student acapella groups, live music, a mechanical bull, and more.

Photo Credit:

Clayton Reynolds. Instagram: ClaytonReynolds27

Yuwan Zhang

May Hathaway

Students Pictured:

Madeleine Lemen

Dustin Taylor

Duncan Miller

Abigail Jones

Lydell Hills

Sarojini Schutt

Nathaniel Magloire

Kara Taylor

Wayne Cornish

Arthur Mutijima

Hannah Lane

Ashley Alyward

Sophie Friets

May Hathaway

Artist Pictured:

Sharnell Huff (Goucher Alum) AKA XennyDreamr

Onye

 

The Poetry Corner Part Two

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As a part of this semester’s theme of community, the Kratz Center for Creative Writing is sponsoring an event series called “Poetry as Community,” bringing local poets to campus. In conjunction with this theme, the Q has asked student poets to send in their own poems along with poetry recommendations. Here are student poets Sebastian Bronson Broddie, ‘20, and Thalia Richter, ‘20 on poets whose work they appreciate.

Sebastian’s Poet Recommendation: Gwendolyn Brooks is well known for crafting powerful poems about racial identity and many hold evidence of her engagement in politics, from when she worked with the NAACP in college. What I most love about Gwendolyn Brooks’s work is her ability to make me feel a great deal more like who I am supposed to be, or to feel a greater appreciation for who I am right now. I always feel like she knows exactly who I am when I read her poems, and that who I am is to be celebrated. Her subjects…sometimes seem to leap right off the page and envelop you in a warm, soft, comforting light.

Thalia’s Poet Recommendation: My favorite book of [Maggie Nelson] is Bluets, which is written as a cross between poetry and prose, ruminating on depression, loneliness, and love through the lens of the color blue. The book begins, “Suppose I were to begin by saying that I had fallen in love with a color. Suppose I were to speak this as though it were a confession.” Nelson’s obsession with the color blue bleeds into her discussions of depression, sometimes eliding the two, so that emotion gains literal visibility. Loneliness is blue, and perhaps parts of love are red, but no matter what, Nelson made me believe in the tangibility and physical realities of these emotions…Her poetry depicts love and heartbreak side-by-side, as though the latter is inevitable, but worth it for the sake of the former…by articulating her loneliness, Nelson creates a sense of shared sadness, and perhaps that can help lessen the burden.

To read the work of Sebstian and Thalia, look here.

Featured Image: Gwendolyn Brooks. Photo Credit: The Poetry Foundation

Hidden Gems: Shopping and Recreation Near Goucher

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Writing 206/Spring 2018

Have you ever wondered what amazing places lay hidden deep beneath the areas around Goucher? Have you ever sat in your room, bored because you’ve already done all the “mainstream” activities offered to you by your friends? If you’ve felt yourself pondering these questions then look no further than the newest segment of the Q for ideas of your future adventures! We are helping students find other activities in and around Goucher that we feel are hidden. These places provide wonderful experiences for you and your group!

10 Car Pile Up
If you’re looking to get off campus, try thrifting at 10 Car Pile Up by the Towson Circle! It is a funky second hand vintage shop with a huge variety of clothing and accessories to choose from. Even if you’re not looking to buy, just walking around and trying on old coats and hats can be a fun outing. With its bright yellow exterior and eccentric window displays, it’s hard to miss when walking past. You’ve probably walked by it without even noticing! It’s a different way to get off campus and enjoy the spaces in Towson that doesn’t have to cost you a lot of money.

The Sound Garden
The Sound Garden is a well-loved part of Fells Point, Baltimore, celebrating their 25th year, however many Goucher students might not know about it. It is a local small business music store that has always been a supporter of up and coming bands and is filled with every CD and vinyl imaginable. From the most obscure album to the most popular, it’s the spot to get a hold of your favorite music. Recently, they added a room that is completely dedicated to vinyl. But, if you’re more of a movie fanatic, they have an entire section of DVDs as well! They have a huge collection ranging from music, DVDs, and band merchandise.
Surrounded by restaurants, shops, cafes, and a short distance away from the water, The Sound Garden’s location makes it ideal to visit and turn a warm, sunny day into a great trip to Baltimore with friends. You can also sell your old CDs and DVDs to the store if you’re looking to get rid of some stuff you don’t use anymore. They make sure they separate the new and old stuff in the store to make it convenient for buyers as well.
They also hold outdoor and in-store concerts and meet-and-greets whenever bands come to town. One band in particular that enjoys performing at The Sound Garden is All Time Low, as all band members are from Baltimore and were given the opportunity to perform at the store when the band was just beginning many years ago.

The Book Thing
Founded in September of 1999, The Book Thing is a free book store located in Baltimore. The store’s philosophy is giving books that people don’t want to people who do want them. Every book in the store is completely free. The only catch is that the books are not for resale.
Russell Wattenberg founded The Book Thing after hearing teachers talking about how they were not able to provide lower income students with enough reading materials. There is a limit of “150,000 books per person” so there is essentially no limit to the number of books that an individual can take with them.
The Book Thing is able to keep their doors open because of volunteer workers, and a consistent flow of in-person and mail-in donations. The store is open to the public every Saturday and Sunday from 9am to 5pm, however volunteers work at the store Monday through Friday from 10am to 4pm to keep the shelves stocked.
For more information visit: http://bookthing.org/#home

The Tin Roof
The Tin Roof is a small live music joint that serves both cheap beer and tasty food. The fun, casual and eclectic feel of the bar makes it the perfect spot to have fun with friends and make new ones.
The bar has hosted hundreds of bands since their creation, and live musicians are showcased on their stage seven days a week. Apart from live music, The Tin Roof also hosts events ranging from bar crawls to watch parties and karaoke nights. It’s even possible to book the bar for group parties and events with a customized entertainment package that caters to your group’s specific wants and needs.
The bar is open Tuesday-Sunday 11am-2am, Mondays 4pm-2am, and is located within Baltimore’s Power Plant Live at the Inner Harbor. If you’re looking for a laid-back atmosphere and a friendly crew, grab a brew, eat some food, make some friends and support local musicians at the Tin Roof in Baltimore.
For more information visit: https://www.tinroofbaltimore.com/about

The National Aquarium
Although this is not exactly a hidden gem, there are still a great deal of people who don’t know about the Aquarium. Tickets to the National Aquarium normally run $24.95 for children and $39.95 for adults.
Recently I was looking through their website and found that they do half price Fridays after 5 pm. This half price deal makes it much more accessible for college students or those on a budget. Half price Friday night starts at 5 p.m. and the last entrance is 7:30 p.m. which gives you ninety minutes to tour after the last entry–plenty of time to make it through the whole aquarium!

Rocky Point Park and Beach in Essex, MD. Photo Credit: Google Images.

Rocky Point Park and Beach located in Essex, MD
If you are looking for an adventure on a sunny day, check out Rocky Point Park and Beach located in Essex, MD. The park is open to the public year round for fishing, boating, and swimming. The park includes a sandy beach with a designated swimming area and an expansive view of the Chesapeake Bay. This is an ideal spot for a picnic with friends.

Club Chat: Eco Team

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In the last issue of the Q, there was an article about a recent coalition of environmentally minded clubs on campus. Goucher has a long history of environmental organizations, and this week we’ll look at the newest member of this legacy: the Eco Team. I spoke with club president Kat Elicker (‘19).

Why did you decide to start the club?
I’ve always known since I was a freshman, that I was going to be an environmental studies major. It was one of my passions. I’m also a Dorsey scholar, and they encourage you to find some kind of niche to grow your leadership skills. And I thought ‘well, I’ll be part of the environmental club on campus, and work my way up’.
When I had first toured the school, I had heard of four different ones, and when I got here I went to the club fair and couldn’t find any except for Ag Co-op. Don’t get me wrong: I love gardening, but it wasn’t really what I was looking for. I found out there was a club named GEAR – but it was dying down. I couldn’t figure out when their meeting times were.
My Sophomore year, I was like ‘you have to find this club!’. And I found it, and found out is was no longer a club. So I looked into a few other clubs, tried those out. My junior year I told myself ‘ you know, the Dorsey people said find your niche and grow in it, but maybe I should grow my niche myself.’ So I decided to create an environmental club on campus, sort of like GEAR. Since I didn’t have the same goals or guidelines set up like GEAR did, I wasn’t going to rename the club GEAR. So we go by the Eco Team. Had a good ring to it.

What’s the purpose of your organization?
Where GEAR was environmental action, we’re environmental awareness. The point really is to raise awareness on campus about how people can have more green practices, and be more sustainable in their everyday living. I feel that Goucher is a school that looks at the broad picture when it comes to sustainability, but then they forget the little things. Things that we as students are going to have to take on, because they are not going to implement them.
So the idea is to have at least one or two action projects a semester. And hopefully if the club continues on after me, they might do more environmental action.

What are your plans this coming semester?
We hope to do some club bonding: probably a documentary movie night within the club. We also want to work with FMS and construction in making sure there is proper recycling in the new buildings. We are also putting up new recycling posters soon. Moving into future semesters, it’s going to be a case by case basis. We’ve heard about some freshman peers who want to deal with the single use plastic issue at Alice’s and Huebeck, and we might partner with them next semester.

Do you think Goucher is an environmentally friendly campus? How can it improve?
It was difficult as a student to see how Goucher isn’t sustainable, but it’s really in day to day life. When they were moving the buildings, they had initiatives to try and reduce construction waste and buildup- but that led to a bunch of trees being cut down. They say they have an initiative where for every one tree they cut down they plant two, but where do they plant them? There are just logistical things, where their overall mindset is green, but I see a lot of faults in the things they do. Thankfully, there are places you can go if you want to see change happen. That’s part of the reason why I started the club, so there would be another place you could go to.

Why should people participate?
It’s a space where people can talk about their environmental passions, and also make friends. If you want to come to my club, if your looking for the environmental side of things where you are making recycling posters and talking to people about the practices they have – then our club is the place to do it. But if you don’t, I would be more than happy to have people come to our club if there is a problem they see on campus that they would like to address. I don’t want them to feel like they need to be committed to the club after that. Come and say your piece. We can work on it, maybe only a small change, and after that, you can stay with us or put your time somewhere else until you have another idea.

And that’s that for this installment of club chat! Interested in having your organization featured in the next issue of the Q? Email me at firut001@mail.goucher.edu for your chance to be in the next edition!

Featured Image: Eco Team focuses on increasing environmental awareness on campus. Photo Credit: Google Images

In Memoriam: Professor Emerita Marianne Githens

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In late February, Goucher received the sad news that Professor Emerita Marianne Githens had passed away. She was 83 years old.
Professor Githens was born in New York City and raised in Long Island. She received her Bachelor of Arts from Marymount Manhattan College before travelling to England to study further. In 1960, she obtained her doctorate from the London School of Economics. While there, she studied European political organizations and French political beliefs.
Professor Githens taught full time at Goucher from 1965 until her retirement in 2014, where she then continued to teach courses part time until 2016. During her tenure, Professor Githen’s advocated for inclusion, diversity, and equity. She supported women’s rights and rights for urban neighborhoods in Baltimore. She is recognized by many as a pioneer scholar in the field of women in politics and was the co-founder of the Women’s Studies Program at Goucher. She also served as the chair of the political science program.
In 1993, Professor Githens was appointed by the European Commission’s Commission of European Communities for Program Development to write a report on women in Europe.
In 2000, Professor Githens was named as Goucher College’s Elizabeth Conolly Todd Distinguished Professor. She won a myriad of awards from Goucher, including the Outstanding Teaching Award, Caroline Doebler Bruckerl Faculty Award, and a Human Rights Scholar Award. She also received a Distinguished Alumna Award from Marymount Manhattan College. After her retirement, she was honored with the title of Professor Emerita for her contributions to academia. Professor Githens helped shape the community that Goucher is today and dedicated her life to ensuring that those without a voice could be heard.

Featured Image: Marianne Githens. Credit: Baltimore Sun

Spin Bikeshare Comes to Goucher

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Goucher’s Bikeshare Program. Photo Credit: Madeline St. John

What’s orange, has two wheels, a couple gears, and makes me think of popsicles and summertime? That’s right. I’m talking about those neon bikes we’ve all seen around campus. They showed up sometime within the past few months, and everytime I see someone on one, I wish I could drop everything and go for a ride. But where did they come from? How can I use one?

I sat down with Gabi Silver, ‘21, to help me answer these questions. Gabi told me that he first saw Spin back in October, when he was visiting D.C. for the weekend. He reached out to Spin personally, asking about potentially bringing a bunch of bikes to campus, and they responded enthusiastically, saying they’d love to bring 25 bikes to Goucher. The following is a piece of my interview with Gabi. Answers have been edited for length and clarity.

NL: If I wanted to rent a bike, what steps would I have to go through to do so for my first time?

GS: It couldn’t be more simple, especially from a user’s point of view. It requires an app, so for iPhone users you go onto the App Store, and for Android users you go onto Google Play. You just search for an app called ‘Spin Bike Share.” It’s an orange app with an orange logo, and once you log on, and you use your goucher.edu email, it automatically sets the rate from $1/half hour to $1/hour. You put in a credit card [number], and from there, you just scan any of the QR codes located on the bike itself, and start your ride. It just kinda charges you for that: from the time the bike unlocks to the time you put the lock down.

NL: Are there rules about taking bikes off campus? How does that work?

GS: Since we’re on a campus, the agreement we made with Spin and the Goucher administration is that when you take a bike out you have to bring it back to campus within 24 hours. So that means that you might want to go to the Post Office, Target, or Walmart, [or anywhere off campus], but as long as the bike is back in the region of Towson within 24 hours, which you can see on the map on the app, you should be good. You shouldn’t get an email from us saying “Please bring the bike back.”

NL: But if someone rents the bike after I end my ride and before I can bring it back to campus, then it’s not my problem.

GS: Exactly. Yes. The actual bike relocation happens between me and the local bike repair company, and that’s not your problem if it happens. And if you do get an email saying you didn’t bring it back, just let me know, and I can definitely forward it to the right party.

NL: How long can I rent the bike for?

GS: We have 25 [bikes], as I said, on the Goucher campus, and there’re 100 at Towson..if you keep it for for 24 hours, you will be charged [the $24] for keeping it for that amount of time. So it’s not the kind of system where we want you to claim it as yours. In fact, that’s highly discouraged and against the Spin user agreement. The intention is to make it a system that’s fun and shareable for everyone.

Hope this helps! If you have any more questions, feel free to reach out to Gabi at gasil001@mail.goucher.edu. Happy riding! 

Neve Levinson

 

Restore the Night: Events

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Restore the Night. Photo Credit: Sarojini Schutt (’18) and Maggie Ratrie (’18)

Events

Friday: To begin the campaign, a resource fair was held on Friday, which included off-campus organizations with resources for survivors, allies, and information on how to get involved. Friday night’s event was similar to the original Take Back the Night. This event was for survivors and their support systems, and provided a safe space for survivors to speak and share their stories. When entering the event, a question was proposed that people could contribute to, and there was a conversation about Goucher’s Sexual Conduct Survey. A speaker from Know Your IX, a D.C. organization, came to the event to talk about Title IX as well as survivor and activism work.

Saturday: A talkback about the zine, “Hear My Voice”, organized by Jamison Curcio (’19) and Elaine Millas (’20), was held. The talkback discussed how the zine went and the reactions is received on campus.

Sunday: A brunch was held for survivors, and afterwards there was a self care through movement workshop for the survivors, led by Jamison Curcio. This workshop explored movement as a form of healing.

Tuesday: Lydell Hills (’18) held a masculinity workshop, for male identifying people. This workshop aimed to break down the masks of masculinity that people live in, and discussed what to do to combat the status quo. This workshop targeted unhealthy vs. healthy masculinity and encouraged male identifying people to spread and normalize this concept.

Tuesday night, was the event Sex in the Dark: Clap Back at the Clap. This event aimed to spread awareness and knowledge about STI’s, with a goal of de-stigmatizing STI’s.

Wednesday: A Rape Culture 101 event was held and led by Summer Torres, the assistant director of the CREI. The same day, a Healthy Relationship Culture conversation was held, where Goucher’s hook-up culture was discussed. This event created a space for students to voice opinions and vent about the hookup culture at Goucher and why it is the way it is. This event also provided a space for people that don’t call themselves survivors or victims to talk about what they are going through. Later, an LGBTQIA survivor comfort space was provided.

Thursday: On the final day of the campaign, an activism teach in, led by speakers from Know Your IX, was held. This teach in provided ways to be an activist with all this information, and spoke about the different levels of activism. Restore the Night ended with a community open mic, which gave a space for people to share poetry, or any form of artistic expression, regarding what they are going through.

Club Chat: Veritas – Philosophy Club

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This week, I got the chance to talk to Veritas – Goucher’s philosophy club. I spoke with Dustin Taylor (‘18) President of Veritas and Antonia Pettit (‘20) Treasurer of the organization.

What are the goals of your organization?
DT: We have two goals. The primary one is that each year we organize and host an undergraduate philosophy conference. We rent out a space, and take philosophy paper submissions from undergraduate students on campus and other schools. There are eight papers presented and people get to ask questions. Students and professors from other schools participate. Then we usually have a keynote speaker at the very end – usually an established professor from another school- who lectures on a topic of their choosing. The conference is the type of experience that will help you if you want to go into academia later on.
Our second goal is to give undergraduate students a more relaxed place to talk about philosophy. We share readings and articles and we get the chance to riff off of each other.

AP: And it’s not just for Philosophy majors. The department here is excellent, but it is a smaller program, so having students from other departments engage with us is really important, especially through the conference.

DT: There’s a lot of things professors might touch on in class, and we decide to talk about it some more. For instance, our professor Margret Grebowicz did an interview with Playboy a few years ago where she talked about the philosophy of kink and BDSM. We were able to have a conversation about that in a place with less pressure to “be right” or impress.

AP: We’ve definitely set up a culture where you can have a philosophical conversation without having a professor judging what you are doing, or having the pressure of writing a paper about it or something like that. It’s all about being able to have those open, free flowing conversations.

How long has the club been going on?
DT: I don’t know about the club, but this will be our 15th conference, so at least 15 years.

What have you done in past conferences?
DT: There’s not an overarching theme in each conference, since we get so many different papers. Our keynote speaker will often end up imposing a theme, which is often about politics; whatever the mainstream political discourse is.
[This year] is Daniel Smith from Perdue. He specializes in cybernetic theory and Gilles Deleuze, who is a French postmodern philosopher.

Is the conference open to the public?
DT: Anyone that wants to come can come. You don’t need to RSVP. All day, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. We provide breakfast, lunch, and dinner – free of charge.

AP: It’s in Buchner. April 7th, on a Saturday.

Why should people choose to spend time with your club?
AP: Because Veritas is so infrequent, it’s not the biggest time commitment. And the conference is only one day, so if you can make that commitment, you can get a lot out of the club.

DT: I think that every department or form of intellectualism is a type of applied philosophy. I think it offers people a chance to think about things on a level that they might not always get to.

Any plans for the future?
DT: Our philosophy of Science fiction class last year would throw movie nights where we would meet as a class and talk about the movie. That’s something I plan to do at least once this semester with Veritas. Invite the club, department, anybody who wants to come.

AP: With me going forward with the club, I definitely want to create more of a structure, and figure out an exact plan of when meetings can happen throughout the semester. It’s hard to do, everyone’s busy and philosophy isn’t the first thing on a lot of people’s minds, but it’s still something that could be valuable to a lot of people.

And that’s that for this installment of club chat! Interested in having your organization featured in the next issue of the Q? Email me at firut001@mail.goucher.edu for your chance to be in the next edition!

Featured image: Goucher’s Philosophy Club, Veritas, will host their 15th annual conference Photo Credit: Goucher College

Goucher High Tide 2018

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An Insider Look at the High Tide Ultimate Frisbee Tournament

So I don’t know how the rest of Goucher students spent their spring break, but I was fortunate enough to spend my spring break in sunny South Carolina for the High Tide Ultimate Tournament with two ultimate frisbee teams from Goucher.
The Goucher men’s team, “Gophbusters”, and the Goucher women’s team, “All You Can Eat” are both part of the Ultimate Frisbee Club here at Goucher, but play as separate teams for the men’s and women’s brackets of the High Tide Tournament.
High Tide is a series of college ultimate frisbee tournaments divided across four weeks and taking place in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Each of the week long tournaments draw in frisbee teams from colleges all across the East Coast and Midwest. As a result, my team and I had the opportunity to face off against a wide variety of opponents, each with unique strengths, weaknesses, and strategies to bring to the field.
Some teams showed better sportsmanship than others, but I personally never felt disrespected or degraded by any of the teams we played against. There was plenty of spirit to go around both on the frisbee field and off of it. Players on both sides swapped stories and jokes on the sidelines while chanting an endless supply of cheers to their teammates. After games you would often find teams congratulating opposing players on their accomplishments and successful plays during the game. When the Goucher men’s team had bye games we would go watch the Goucher women’s team to cheer them on and provide encouragement, and vice versa. The overall vibe of the High Tide Tournament seemed much more friendly and supportive compared to tournaments I’ve played in for other sports such as basketball and baseball.
At the end of the week, when I asked my teammate Brian Barger, ‘21, what his favorite part about High Tide 2018 was, he quickly told me that while he really enjoyed all the time spent playing frisbee, “the community bonding was huge.” Both Brian and I have been part of the ultimate frisbee team since the beginning of the school year, attending numerous practices for two to three days a week for months on end, but spending a week together in a house with the team showed me sides of my teammates that I never saw during practices or games. The senior members of the team did a great job of taking care of the rookies and the rest of the team by helping them stay healthy and well rested in preparation for the rapid barrage of frisbee games we played each day of the tournament. Each ultimate frisbee game at High Tide is 70 minutes long, and teams play between one to four games each day, often back to back unless teams are lucky enough to get a bye game somewhere in between the cluster of matches. Ultimate frisbee involves a huge amount of running up and down the field and the pace of the game is very quick with constant movement and few timeouts. Captains were constantly encouraging teammates to drink plenty of water, gatorade, and even pickle juice for electrolytes to help with muscle cramps and fatigue. When I would finally come back to the house with the rest of the team after each long day of frisbee, both the men’s and women’s team would come together and cook meals for everyone and participate in a variety of bonding activities such as watching movies and making crafts. Captains would then tell us to get to sleep early each night in preparation for the next day of frisbee. Overall, I couldn’t have asked for a better spring break and High Tide had a lot to do with that.

What is the Green Fund?

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Goucher’s Renovation plans. Photo credit: Goucher Blogs

The Green Fund was created in 2013 with the goal of making the college more environmentally friendly. Every student living on campus pays a Green Fund fee of $18 a semester or $36 a year, for an approximate $50,000 a year, depending on the number of undergraduates living on campus. The money from the fee also rolls over from year to year if not all of it is used.
Every year, $5000 of the fund is allocated for student projects. Students can access this money through a grant-style application process, for which applications are processed by GESAC. Previous Green Fund grants have funded research on bicycle use in Towson, and the purchase of beekeeping supplies.
A portion of the fund goes to the GESAC itself for administrative costs such as advertising for the Green Fund, and the fulfillment of reporting requirements for sustainability initiatives, such as the President’s Climate Commitment. Money from the Green Fund fee also pays for consultants and for Goucher’s memberships to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Education (AASHE) and the President’s Climate Commitment.
GESAC also acts as a link among representatives from various sectors of campus (IT, Communications, and Bon Appetit, for example), who report problems and discuss problem-solving strategies in their different areas. For example, GESAC and FMS are currently working on an interactive online user interface to monitor our energy and water usage in near real-time, called Energy Dashboard.
The remaining funds of the Green Fund fee go to Facility Management Services (FMS) to support campus projects related to sustainability, like the Energy Dashboard.

Click here to read about decisions involving the sustainability coordinator position, or here, to read about the new student environmental coalition.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this article published the Green Fund fee as being $84 a year when it is in fact $36.

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