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Features - page 8

Students Mobilize to Defend DACA

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Following the White House announcement to repeal the Deferred Action for Childhood Arivals Program (DACA), a group of Goucher students gathered outside the Athenaeum over the course of several days. They provided information about  ways to defend and support DACA, along with phone numbers and mailing addresses so that students could contact local representatives and express their support for DACA.

Photo Credit: Usha Kaul

Goucher Misses Kelly Brown Douglas

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Dr. Kelly Douglas Photo Credit: Washington National Cathedral

Rev. Dr. Kelly Brown Douglas, Professor of Theology at Goucher College since 2000 has officially left the building and left people crying. Dr. Douglas is now the first African American woman to become Dean at an Episcopal Divinity School (EDS). EDS and Union Theological Seminary have signed a partnership “that will allow EDS to continue as an Episcopal seminary through a collaboration with Union at its campus in New York City beginning in the fall of 2018.” Dr. Douglas received her Pd.D. in systematic theology from Union and the institution is happy to welcome her home. Because the EDS-Union agreement happened fairly quickly, Dr. Douglas unfortunately was unable to have a proper send off or goodbye from the Goucher College community.
While Dr. Douglas will no doubt be an instrumental asset to EDS at Union and this is an incredible opportunity for her career, the people at Goucher–students, faculty, and staff–want to say that she will be missed, in addition to wishing her well in her endeavors.
For the first nine years she was at Goucher, Dr. Douglas ran the religion department single-handedly. Ann Duncan, the current Religion Program Director, Professor of Theology, and Head of the Center Geographies of Justice, said that Dr. Douglas essentially created the religion program and made it into what it is today. Professor Duncan and Dr. Douglas were partners for eight years, and while saddened by her departure, Professor Duncan says “I’m also very excited for her because I know with her recent book and a lot of the ways in which her research is speaking directly to this particular moment in history, the particular concerns, not only of the Christian church, but of the American society, has really been very remarkable to watch. And this I think provides a really wonderful opportunity for her to be able to continue her public speaking, but also to really directly shape the training of some of the future leaders of the Christian church. I am very happy for her.” Professor Duncan, who was well aware of Dr. Douglas’ impact on her students, has high hopes for her future.
Dr. Douglas was always supportive and understanding of her students. Having conducted an independent project with her, I will miss her deeply. Ever since my first class with her at 8am on my first day of college, she has inspired me to study theology. While she ran a busy life, she always had time to talk and check-in with her students and how they were doing. Sarojini Schutt ’18, who took Womanist Theology with Dr. Douglas, says she really admired her teaching style and wishes she had taken more classes with her. If she, Schutt, could say anything to Dr. Douglas at this moment, she would say, “Thank you! You are brilliant, inspiring, and bring so much light wherever you go.” Rev. Dr. Kelly Brown Douglas, Goucher College is going to miss you. Thank you so much for all that you have taught and all you have put into this school; you are phenomenal and there is no replacing you.

Goucher Pets: Daisy the Shih-poo

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Daisy and August chill in Alice’s Restaurant. Photo credit: Julianna Head

When August Shah, ‘19, walks into a room with his puppy Daisy in his arms, she  immediately becomes the center of attention. At Alice’s before our interview, an entire table of folks gets up and showers the excited pup with attention, oo-ing and ah-ing.
“This is the cutest dog I’ve ever seen in my life,” someone comments.
“She’s so soft. I love her so much,” says someone else.
After a few minutes, August is able to sit down with me. “She loves it all – the attention, the people, other animals – absolutely loves it. She likes getting away from home for a bit too.”
Daisy is August’s pet and emotional support animal. “It’s actually kind of funny. I was supposed to get a different puppy, but due to a mix-up, that one was already gone. I don’t mind though. When I saw Daisy I knew she was the one for me. I was so lucky that the name ‘Daisy’ fit her, because I’d already fallen in love with the name too.”

Daisy is a three-month-old Shih-tzu/Poodle mix, commonly called a Shih-poo. She’s brown in color and her fur is curly, a dead giveaway to her poodle lineage. She’s small and can easily fit in cupped hands. Daisy’s breeder mistreated her, but she is now living happily with August off campus. As a puppy, she sleeps most of the day. In fact, she’s only awake for about four hours each day. When she’s not sleeping, she’s playing. When I met her a week ago, her favorite toy was a bright green stuffed animal frog, with long legs perfect for a game of tug-of-war. Now, though, she prefers tennis balls.
“She likes being able to move them around and chase them,” says August. “She’ll also jump up a bit and flip over with her toy and wrestle it a little. It’s super cute to watch.”
To train her, August uses a combination of toys and affection. “She hates treats,” he says. “She loves love. She’s potty trained, crate trained, and we’re working on getting her to sit. She gets super excited and hyper sometimes, so it can be hard to get her to sit still.”

“The most lovable, playful puppy you’ll ever meet.” Photo Credit: Emily Conway

“I love her. She’s the most lovable, playful puppy you’ll ever meet. She’s brought a lot more joy into my life and has made everything so much brighter. I wouldn’t say she’s fully relieved me of stress, because puppies can be a handful, but she’s made me so much happier.”
There are many dogs on campus, but unlike some of the other animals at Goucher, dogs don’t appear to have a ‘club.’ There are no events specific to dogs, where dog owners and their pups can socialize and play. There are ‘school’ dogs, of course, such as ACE’s Lucy, but perhaps a small, dog-specific event is called for, which would allow everyone to enjoy their company.
For now, though, Daisy is content with surprise appearances at Alice’s and around campus. On warm, sunny days, she and August can occasionally be found at the picnic table in the Residential Quad next to construction, he working on schoolwork and she napping.

The CDO’s Weekly Coffee Chats

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Free Donuts and Coffee every Friday in the CDO! Credit: Bon Appetit

As we kick off a new academic year, it is yet another opportunity for us to further prepare for our future careers. You’re probably already asking yourself what you can do now, as an undergrad, to facilitate your job hunting process upon graduation. You’ve most likely heard the word “networking” numerous times, but you’re not quite sure exactly what it entails. The Goucher College Career Development Office (CDO) has answers for you.
Last semester, the CDO launched a new weekly series called Coffee Chats. Every Friday from 9:30-11:30 am, the CDO invites a couple of Goucher alumni to share their knowledge and experience with students. We’ve hosted about 50 alums from wide-ranging backgrounds, including but not limited to attorneys, clinical professors of law, Certified Financial Planners, and presidents of non-profits. The purpose of these coffee chats is to give students an opportunity to talk to professionals who were once in their shoes and went on to succeed in the working world. This is networking, folks!
The Coffee Chats are super laid back and casual. You can ask whatever is on your mind and pop in and out as your schedule allows. It is an easy way to meet people who can answer questions regarding life after college, finding a job, and fending for yourself. And there’s free coffee and donuts!
We hope to see you on Friday!

ZULA MUCYO

CERT: A Team That’s There to Help

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Join CERT to help prepare your community for emergencies. Credit: bosquecounty.us

After the recent natural disasters in the news, you might be wondering–what is Goucher doing to prepare for natural disasters and other emergencies? And what can I, here at Goucher, do to help?
One possible answer is CERT. CERT stands for Community Emergency Response Team. CERT is a group of trained volunteers who have the knowledge and equipment to assist at the scene of an emergency before professionals arrive. They can manage crowds, and perform basic search and rescue, triage/first aid, and fire suppression. In the case of a hurricane, they would lead people to safe zones, assist Public Safety, and provide any other necessary assistance.
CERT members also have backpacks that are equipped with a variety of supplies, including first aid kits, helmets, gloves, goggles, flashlights, and other safety tools.
Nothing is a substitute for preparedness in the case of an emergency. Community members can prepare on an individual level by gathering supplies. CERT president Sam Meir-Levi, ‘18, recommends having a backpack stocked with: a first aid kit, flashlights, batteries, filled water bottles, a blanket, non-perishable food, sanitation and personal hygiene supplies, and any necessary medications.
An emergency backpack could also include rain gear, duct tape, scissors, whistle, plastic sheets, etc. When an emergency hits, “you shouldn’t be just thinking about these things for the first time,” said Duncan Miller, ‘19, the treasurer for CERT.
Goucher students, faculty and staff can also ready themselves by being aware of their surroundings, and knowing where the nearest entrances and exits are in buildings on campus. This is especially important given the obstacles created by construction, which may limit access to entrances and exits.
The community action that CERT organizes and supports is especially important because of the internal knowledge of the community that its members have. People within a community will have a better understanding of resources, needs, hazards, and strains, argues Kayhla Cornell, assistant registrar in the Graduate Programs in Education, who is also a member of CERT.
Cornell, who has an environmental justice perspective when it comes to disaster preparedness, also mentioned that the number and severity of natural disasters around the world is increasing. Rather than rely entirely on external aid, community members should work together to prepare for them. Cornell encourages involvement in organizations like CERT, that help people to be involved in the community, advocate for themselves, as well as be better prepared for emergencies. Cornell also hopes that, in the future, the Goucher program will work more closely with local organizations, and serve as a local flagship, encouraging other schools to become certified.
The more people who are trained and involved in CERT, the wider their range of communication, the more ground they will cover, and the more people they will help. To get involved, reach out to David Heffer <David.Heffer@goucher.edu>, Sam Meir-Levi, or Duncan Miller. CERT will also be sending out emails and putting up fliers with information about upcoming trainings.

Faculty Insider: Prof. Mary Marchand

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“Stories are like events best undergone as a group,” says Prof. Mary Marchand. “They help us broaden our perspectives on life and move past our individual assumption.” Photo Credit: Danielle Brundage

As students, we have all taken classes that have contributed to our understanding of the world at varying levels. Some have been better than others, depending on our interest in the subject matter. If we are lucky, however, we encounter a professor who completely reshapes our understanding of a subject, whether it initially interests us or not. For many Goucher students, Mary Marchand is one such professor.
For 22 years, Prof. Marchand has directed the American Studies program. Goucher was one of the first colleges to offer this radical, interdisciplinary program in 1949, only one year after Yale. With only one core course requirement, the little known major allows students to draw from three different programs in order to define the Americas- its history, its cultures- for themselves. In fact, Prof. Marchand was also the program director for Individualized Interdisciplinary Majors for 10 to 15 years. She thus teaches several literature courses, both as part of the program and the English department.
Prof. Marchand grew up in Minnesota, where she graduated from the University of St. Olaf with a major in English and minor in Philosophy. She earned her Master’s and PhD at the University of Wisconsin. Despite three job offers in very different parts of the country, circumstances brought her to Maryland, where she fell in love with Goucher. “There is a kindness and quirkiness to my students that I really value… like a sort of openness and curiosity,” she explains.
Prof. Marchand believes that literature plays a special role in developing broader perspectives on the world and bridging divides. “Stories are like events best undergone as a group,” she says. “They help us broaden our perspectives on life and move past our individual assumption.” When we delve into the literary world, she explains, “we often read and understand points of view we would normally see as unforgivable.” Literature is meant to break rules, as well as challenge the status quo and ourselves as individuals, a process that Prof. Marchand sees as integral to the college experience. In her opinion, it is especially important in our time when assumptions are being made by the left and right. To her, college is a place to bring conflicting opinions together and experience friction. Yet it also has to be a place where people have the opportunity to participate in open discourse. This is probably the greatest challenge for her as a professor: creating a safe enough space for everyone to have a say while still encouraging a diversity of opinions.
Despite this dilemma, Prof. Marchand’s courses are reputed for their engaging conversations- a term she prefers over the contrived word ‘discussion’. Through these conversations, she explains, “most of the classes kind of just reveal themselves.” For example, students find meaning in an American literary canon often written off as dull and impractical. The key is “to ask the types of questions that lead to better understanding or thinking,”  which is one of many lessons she learned from her favorite professor and role model: her dad. He was a professor of humanities and director of theater at the University of Minnesota. “My dad… loved his work so much. He thought that one of the most important things in the world was to make people fall in love with learning again,” she explains. “[His] special gift was to listen intently.” Just like her father, Prof. Marchand values everyone’s voice in the classroom, earning the appreciation of many of her students.
In addition to her father’s mentoring, teaching for the Goucher Prison Education Program for two and a half years deeply shaped Prof. Marchand’s teaching style. “It was life changing. It was the most meaningful work I’ve ever done.” Working with people largely shut out of education from a very young age, she had to find ways to increase their joy and confidence in learning, separating their anxiety from their coursework. “It made me a better professor.”
When Prof. Marchand isn’t busy teaching classes or grading papers, she loves to cook. “You can see my ribbons there,” she points to her office board, chuckling. “I entered the [Maryland State Fair] contest as a joke one year; my son at the time entered in a logo contest, my husband entered a photo contest, and it kind of became a quirky thing we started doing.” She envisions a Goucher cooking standoff between departments, though she ponders about whom might be the appropriate judges.
She also spends her time between classes researching for her newest project on crime scene photography. Fascinated by early forensics of late 19th century France, she examines how identity was determined at that time using biometrics. She is currently looking for student researchers to join her in this endeavor! Perhaps this is not your primary field of interest, but with the guidance of a dedicated and beloved professor it is sure to be a transformative experience.

The CDO’s Professional Clothing Closet

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It is that time of the year again. School is back in session, and so are various career preparation opportunities. Maybe you have an upcoming college job fair to attend. Better yet, you’ve scored an interview for your dream internship. Sadly, in the midst of the tremendous excitement of seeing your friends again, you forgot to pack any professional attire. Don’t panic; the last thing we want is for you to be excluded from significant educational or vocational opportunities. The Goucher College Career Development Office (CDO) has a solution for you: the Professional Clothing Closet.
We at the CDO know that dressing appropriately for an interview, career fair, or networking event is key to boosting your confidence and helping you make a great first impression as a candidate. The clothing closet, free of charge to all currently enrolled students, is a resource to make sure you have everything you need to be successful in your job search. Thanks to generous donations from Goucher’s faculty, staff, and alums, the inventory includes suits, blazers, skirts, sweaters, dresses, ties, collared button-ups, shirts, shoes and more—in both men’s and women’s styles.
We want to help you make a positive impression as you enter the professional world. Stop by the CDO in Van Meter 117, Monday through Friday from 10am- 4pm to check it out. Spread the word!

ZULA MUCYO

Rascal: A Goucher Rabbit

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A Rascal of a Rabbit. Photo Credit: Mikaela Smith

On any given day at Goucher, students will walk down Van Meter and encounter dogs and other pets. However, students walking near Sondheim on a warm, sunny day may also see one of Goucher’s resident rabbits, Rascal. Owned by Mikaela Smith, Rascal is an eight-year-old Dutch Giant rabbit. Dutch giants are one of the largest rabbit breeds, and are easily recognizable by their distinct, often black-and-white, fur markings. Mikaela has had Rascal since he was ten weeks old and got him from a bunny farm in Missouri. This will be his third semester at Goucher as Mikaela’s emotional support animal.

Many students have emotional support animals that they bring to campus. There are a wide variety of them, including cats, dogs, rabbits, ferrets, and reptiles. Some animals don’t acclimate well to campus life, but Rascal seems to be having no problems.
“He’s very adaptable,” Mikaela says, “and has never really caused a fuss. He binkied yesterday (September 4th) in my room.”
Rabbits binky when they are especially happy. When a rabbit binkies, they jump into the air and twist their body and head in different directions before falling back to the ground. A binkying rabbit is a happy, relaxed, content rabbit. In addition, rabbits also flop to signal that they trust you. Flops are when a rabbit throws itself on its side. When a rabbit flops, it can be surprising to people who aren’t often around rabbits.

What a cute bunny! Photo Credit: Mikaela Smith

“When I first saw my rabbit flop, for a second I thought he had had a heart attack and died,” says Paige Harris, owner of Poe the bunny, another well-known rabbit at Goucher.

Having an emotional support animal is important to many students on campus to keep them calm and help them focus on work. “I had trouble with papers during my first year first semester here. I definitely noticed an improvement once I got him here,” Mikaela says.
Another student, who prefers not to be named, has said much the same: “I don’t know what I’d do without my pet here. She helps me calm down when I get too stressed, and taking care of her reminds me that I have to take care of myself. I’ve gotta be here for her, y’know?
And while there are many communities at Goucher, one of the newest ones caters specifically to bunnies: the Goucher Bunny Community. It recently debuted at the Involvement Fair, with Mikaela at the helm, though it’s been active for at least a semester. She is one of the founders of the community, along with Paige Harris. The Bunny Community also has a Facebook page (@goucherbunny), filled with pictures of Rascal, funny rabbit drawings, and notifications for when events take place. Most events are bunny get-togethers, where rabbits and owners alike can socialize. Even if you don’t have a rabbit, you’re welcome to come to an event to spend time with the rabbits and learn more about them.
“Rabbits are generally social creatures,” says Paige. “They live in warrens in the wild, and can form bonds. When they form bonds, it’s like they’ve found their best friend and never want to be separated.”
Just like with us, many of Goucher’s resident pets aren’t fond of the construction.

Rascal Poses. Photo Credit: Mikaela Smith

“Rascal’s mostly okay with it, he just doesn’t like the noise,” Mikaela says.
However, it’s not the construction that can cause the most stress to Goucher’s pets. It’s the fire alarms. Last week, most of the residential houses began their annual fire alarm drill. Many were glad it wasn’t happening at three in the morning like it had in the past, but the change in time doesn’t mean less stress for the animals.
Waiting in the residential quad for the alarm to stop going off, I witnessed someone run past a safety officer and into Sondheim. When they returned, they had Rascal in their arms, his ears high and alert.
“I couldn’t just leave him,” they said. “When I got in he was freaking out and banging his head against his cage. He hates these things.” They walked away, taking him to a quieter part of the quad so that he could calm down and hopefully munch on some grass.
Rascal is fine now and enjoying some of his favorite activities: eating lettuce, running around, and nibbling on Mikaela’s things.

Goucher EATS: Food Labels

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In my personal form of teenage rebellion (or more likely, an attempt to sneakily lower my caloric consumption) I refused to eat red meat sometimes in high school. It had never really been a regular part of my diet before then, but I had never labeled it as off limits either. I think along the way I convinced myself that it was because of health reasons, that the protein it provided wasn’t worth the other “unhealthy” characteristics. After a few months I even used the excuse that my body would no longer be able to process it and eating it would make me sick. But again, it was honestly just an excuse to be able to say “I don’t eat that,” something to make me feel that I was able to flat out refuse to eat some foods on principle.
There are many ways to have dysfunctional relationships with food, and I’ll admit, I’ve dabbled in most of them. But regardless of the reason, I didn’t eat red meat for years. For the most part, it really wasn’t an issue. Over time my father, a former meat cutter (bless his very patient heart), even offered to buy ground turkey when making meat sauce or turkey sausage when making kielbasa dishes. The restaurant where I work has a thing for bacon (I think most chefs and restaurants do, to be fair), which meant a lot of times I would politely decline trying dishes. But several of my coworkers were vegetarians, so no one ever made a big deal about it.

Eat what makes you feel healthy and happy! Photo credit: Google images.

But last spring break I worked a few shifts shortly after the menu had changed, so our chef had been passing me samples of the new dishes. Half way through the night, he slid me a bowl and told me try it. “What is it?” I asked. “Short rib ravioli.” I considered passing it on to someone else, but I realized I didn’t want to and I didn’t want to feel like I had to simply because it was something I had told myself I wasn’t allowed to eat. So I grabbed a fork and took a bite. “I haven’t eaten red meat in five years.” I told him, “And that was really stupid.”
Food walks this strange line because on the one hand our relationship with it is very scientific; you must eat to survive at a very visceral level. But there is also this intensely emotional side. People associate certain memories and feelings with certain foods, and to many, food is art. I think a lot of what we choose to eat or not eat takes both sides into account as we try to determine what is best for us, but also what we want.
I’m not saying that choosing not to eat certain things is always a poor decision. If you choose to be a vegan, or vegetarian, or gluten free, that’s fine. But don’t do it because you feel like you should. If you feel healthier and happier, then that is great. But if every time you see a plate of bacon you feel sad because you want it but can’t have it because you’re a vegetarian, maybe reevaluate. Don’t choose a diet just because it allows you to claim abstinence from certain foods if you like those foods and they don’t adversely affect your health.
We are a society obsessed with categorization. We like things to fit in a box; we like for ourselves to fit into these boxes. I think that is what is so attractive about labeled eating patterns like “vegan.” But people don’t always fit into boxes. So if most days you don’t eat meat, but sometimes you just really want filet mignon, don’t feel like you have to label yourself a vegetarian and constantly suppress that occasional desire for steak.
My relationship with food has come a long way. It can be so easy to get in your own head and make food into more than it needs to be. That artistic side and scientific side perfectly collide when we eat. We appreciate the artistry and the emotions attached to the food, while our bodies rejoice at the fact that we’re giving them sustenance. So eat what makes you feel healthy and happy. Eat what you want and decline what you don’t, but don’t worry about putting a label on it.

The Office of Accessibility Services (OAS)

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Arnelle Hanley from the Office of Accessibility Services (OAS). Photo credit: OAS

Goucher’s Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) opened its doors four months ago, and its director Arnelle Hanley has been busy at work ever since. The purpose of OAS is to provide a space for students who are seeking accommodations “to better engage with the Goucher community,” according to Hanley. Her work is not limited to learning or physical disabilities. Rather she is available to help students gain access to help with whatever limitations and barriers they may experience inside the classroom and all around campus. This can range from long term, chronic issues to temporary issues, such as broken ankles.
She collaborates with “pretty much any office that you can think of,” including residential life, counseling, health services, FMS, dining services, admissions, financial aid, and the Office of International Studies. She’s been meeting with prospective students and their families through admissions. With OIS, she’s been helping students think about the accessibility of the study abroad programs they’re considering and supporting them with aspects of their applications. She’s also been meeting with every academic center. She’s been a part of ongoing conversations with FMS about what accessibility looks like as Goucher is building new buildings and what it looks like in our current buildings in regards to what types of accommodations we can make now to make the buildings more accessible.
In respect to the dining halls, she may help students navigate dietary restrictions, as well as help develop systems that will make the dining halls more physically accessible for students who use a wheelchair or cane. One idea she’s been in conversation with the dining facilities about is the acquisition of trays for those who need to better balance their food and plates and utensils, etc.
Yet, Hanley’s job doesn’t stop there. “I look at my job as not just helping students access Goucher, but also preparing them to advocate for themselves after Goucher…I’m always thinking of life after Goucher.” She strives to empower students to advocate for themselves while at Goucher so that they can do so confidently with HR in their future careers: “Your parents can’t call your future employer,” she says.
Currently located in an office in the Alumni House, she will hold open hours for students to book appointments with her on Starfish. In the meantime, students can email her at arnelle.hanely@goucher.edu. “If you’re not sure who to go to, start with me…once you talk to me, I already know who the contact person is for you,” she says. ACE, Frona Brown (the Learning Disabilities specialist), and Hanley are developing a system that will allow them to effectively communicate between themselves. Starting the conversation with Hanley will allow her to efficiently direct students to the best resources for their personal needs. If a student already has a relationship with ACE or Frona Brown, Arnelle encourages them to maintain those relationships, but any student who hasn’t yet developed a relationship with these resources should contact Hanley first to discuss whether they need accommodations and what those resources would look like. Hanley reiterates that “my office is here to help you problem solve, not to solve your problems.”
Students, faculty, and staff can help Hanley make Goucher more accessible by reporting all barrier issues they notice and experience on campus. This can be suggestions as to where handrails can be placed around campus, or something as specific as the magnet locks being so low in a dorm building that people are likely to hit their heads on such a barrier. Reporting handicap buttons that don’t work and any barriers in classrooms are also helpful.
For more information about the Office of Accessibility Services and other campus resources, please visit the new and up-to-date Accessibility website: http://www.goucher.edu/student-life/accessibility-services.

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