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Charles Blow: Musings on Modern activism

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On November 1st, visual op-ed columnist for the New York Times, political commentator, and best-selling author, Charles M. Blow, was invited to lecture in Meyerhoff. Addressing the Goucher and wider Towson community, Blow framed his discussion within the context of relationships, resilience, and reflection; a motto adopted by Goucher to describe the ideal outcomes students would gain from their education. While the three Rs were originally meant for usage in an academic setting, Blow applied them to his philosophy behind the fight for equity in an unjust society.

“Blow’s stance on the necessity of open expression is one that has been interpreted by some as a critique of ‘sheltered spaces’ often associated with liberal arts colleges like Goucher.” Photo Credit: John Patterson (via Charles Blow’s Instagram)

Goucher prides itself on its sense of community. In reference to this, Blow began his remarks on with his own thoughts about communities. He pointed out the need for communities that stretch across identity. These types of communities don’t occur as naturally as would be hoped, which Blow explained was the result of an age old idea that “sameness is safety”. As humans, Blow stated, we are attracted to people who are similar to us, and congregate in such groups. He argued that these groups rob us of something important: growth and empathy towards others.
‘Privilege’ and ‘oppression’ were two frequent terms that Blow used. In his remarks, Blow borrowed the words of Toni Morrison to describe racism as “a robbery”. Blow expanded the use of the word to encapsulate all kinds of oppression and to capture a core idea of why these oppressions must be fought against. Discrimination robs us of time, energy, motivation and other personal facets that could have been used in a more productive way, he argued. In this sense, it hurts the whole of society, not just the individuals specifically targeted by it. It must be actively combatted. “Inaction is a choice,” he stated. “If you are not totally against oppression, you are for it.”
Blow regarded the recent election “backlash” as nothing new. He cited it as a pattern that has always been a part of American history. He described the battle for equity as “messy” and a necessary process where “feelings will be hurt.” Blow’s stance on the necessity of open expression is one that has been interpreted by some as a critique of “sheltered spaces” often associated with liberal arts colleges like Goucher. Blow emphasized that the emotional pain associated with open discussions must be felt in order for real progress to be made. “Fragility cannot be the frame for these discussions,” he said. Though he did not state it explicitly, he seemed critical of the concepts that drive ideas like safe spaces and affinity meetings. He argued that fragility made discussion untruthful by leading people to lie to try and make others comfortable. “You have to be hurt,” he emphasized.
Blow also made a few humorous remarks on politics. “You may have heard, I have a few thoughts on that,” Blow joked when he first brought up the topic. Blow commented on politics when he began answering audience questions.  Blow discussed the role of media coverage in politics, particularly during an administration in which the president is an avid tweeter. Blow felt he had an obligation as a journalist to cover Trump’s tweets, yet he made it clear that the president’s behavior, especially toward his disabled colleague Serge Kovaleski, was completely inappropriate.
Another topic brought up through audience questions was the current state of news and media organizations, something which Blow had surprisingly left out of his initial remarks. Blow was particularly critical of news organizations preventing minority reporters from covering stories within their communities. He explained that by assuming minority reporters are “biased” towards other minorities, news organizations are simultaneously claiming that being white, cis, male, Christian, etc. is a “neutral” position. He also criticized the trend toward “snap news”, which is characterized by shorter and shorter segments and “Yelling, yelling, yelling,” as he described.
As his final comments for the evening, Blow reflected on what the end result of advocacy for social justice would look like; What would an equitable world look like? “Liberation looks like the truth,” he finally said.

Goucher Pets: Botticelli the Ferret

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Botticelli the ferret, owned by Rebecca Silber ’19, is one and a half years old and has been at Goucher since August of 2017. Silber has owned Botticelli for a little over a year.

Botticelli the ferret. Credit: Rebecca Silber

“We met at Petco,” says Silber. “I’d been frequenting the local pet shops looking for the right match for several weeks. I went to visit him multiple times until I knew he was the right one. He was much bigger, and a bit older than the other ferrets because he’d been adopted and returned. The Petco staff said that he’d been returned malnourished, with cigarette burns on his ears. I couldn’t help but get him after hearing that.”
Now, Botticelli doesn’t have to worry about mistreatment. Silber cares for him just as much as he cares for her. As her emotional support animal, Botticelli helps alleviate Silber’s anxiety. “Having him grounds me to the space and allows me to feel a sense of home,” she says. “Having him means I have to be conscious of my surroundings and that I have to be there for him. Sometimes just looking at him helps calm me down, and if I’m having a panic attack I’ll let him out and he’ll run around. Focusing on him means not focusing on myself, and I calm down far quicker.”
Running around is one of Botticelli’s favorite activities, along with digging. Silber’s succulents have been dug up more than a few times, and most of them are now dead. Botticelli also loves cat toys, such as laser pointers and anything with a string. “He’s also a big fan of any sort of bag he can get into, especially if it makes noise while he rustles around,” says Silber.
Though ferrets are a fairly common pet in the United States according to the American Veterinary Association, people often do a double-take when they see Botticelli around campus. “He’s harnessed-trained, though many ferrets aren’t because you have to get them used to the harness as soon as you get them,” says Silber. “A lot of people think he’s a very small dog or kitten when they first see him. They often ask to pet him, which he loves, and he especially loves getting attention from children. I’ve had a lot of older people tell me that they remember ferrets from the ‘80s. He’s a unique one.”
Ferrets come in a variety of colors, including chocolate, silver, albino, and cream. Like cats, ferrets can squeeze themselves into nearly any space, thanks to their flexible rib cage. Unlike cats, though, ferrets require a lot of attention.
“Ferrets aren’t good for inexperienced pet owners. Botticelli can be destructive and loves getting into my trashcan. That he’s deaf doesn’t change the fact that he can be quite mischievous.” According to Silber, about 75% of white ferrets are deaf and affectionately known as Wardys. “Because he’s deaf the construction doesn’t affect him at all. He loves it here! I spend more time with him here than I do at home.”
Ferrets, like otters, are part of the mustelidae family and are carnivores. “[Botticelli] eats a special ferret food that I get off of Amazon. Most of the ferret food in pet stores is the equivalent of junk food for ferrets. Admittedly, he likes junk food a lot more, but I’m trying to be careful because malnutrition can lead to issues with the lymph system. He loves chicken and eggs,” Silber says. “A lot of people will feed their ferrets mice or chicks, but I used to have pet rats and I can’t stomach it.”

Botticelli the ferret. Credit: Rebecca Silber

Botticelli is very friendly and can often be found sleeping, as ferrets sleep about seventeen hours a day. “He’s a great pet for a busy person. If you ever see us out and about, feel free to come say hi.”

First Years Spraypaint Drains to Prevent Pollution

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Left to Right: Andrew Ackerman, Oliver Dillard, Luke DeWitt, Jolie Price, Erica Bulzomi, and Brady O’Neill Photo Credit: Dr. Cynthia Kicklighter

Earlier this semester, you might have seen groups of people huddling around storm drains, gazing intensely at the pavement. This was probably Dr. Cynthia Kicklighter’s First Year Seminar (FYS). They are learning about marine organisms, and what impacts marine environments. One of the topics they are covering is trash pollution in the ocean, and how trash travels into waterways through storm drains. This trash affects our drinking water, pollutes our oceans, and affects marine life.
In the Towson/Baltimore area, all water entering storm drains eventually arrives at the Chesapeake Bay. Because plastic cannot be digested and it can entangle marine organisms like fish and turtles, plastic trash (like grocery bags, snack bags, etc) is particularly harmful.
In order to educate people on campus about this danger and the fact that all trash from our storm drains will end up in the Chesapeake, Dr. Kicklighter learned how to stencil a storm drain. The training was organized Blue Water Baltimore, an environmental charity focused on restoring the quality of Baltimore’s aquatic systems. She then transferred what she had learned from the organization to her First Year Seminar students, who, in the middle of the semester, spray painted stencils of marine life around the storm drains on campus.
“It was freezing outside,” wrote Jillian Carsud (‘19). But the “hands-on experience” was enjoyable.
Jolie Price (‘19) agreed. “I liked the actual ‘doing’ aspect of spreading awareness instead of just talking about it in class,” she wrote. Both students hoped that their project would cause passersby to pause and consider the stencils, increasing awareness about where our trash goes and who it affects.

High Number of Goucher Grads Teach for America

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Rae Walker ‘17 is is currently teaching at Dr. Carter G. Woodson Elementary/Middle School (PK-8th). Photo Credit: TFA Baltimore

This past year, Goucher was among the top colleges and universities to contribute new members to the Teach For America 2017 corps. With six alumni joining, Goucher contributed significantly to a nationwide network. This past year was also the first year that students were able to apply early to the program–during their junior year of college. Two Goucher students did so and were accepted.
Teach for America (TFA) is a national organization that certifies recent graduates and others without teaching certification to work as teachers in low-income communities. Applicants fill out an online application and complete a group interview online or in-person. Once accepted, applicants fill out a form with their location preferences from a list of 53 different regions across the nation. TFA teachers commit to teaching for at least two years as full-time salaried employees of the school in which they are placed.
As an organization, TFA focuses on understanding and combating educational inequity, an angle that tends to appeal to Goucher graduates. For Rae Walker (‘17) this was one of the reasons he decided to apply. “[As a public school student], the quality of your education literally depends on your zipcode,” Walker said in an interview. “In Parkville they have iPads while in Cherry Hill, we’re struggling for paper. And that’s needed for the curriculum, because they [the school] don’t buy textbooks.”
Walker graduated from Goucher as an English major with a concentration in creative writing. He knew he wanted to be a teacher, but he dropped his major in education because he believed that focusing on his content area (English) was more important than learning theory.
Walker is currently teaching special education at Dr. Carter G. Woodson Elementary Middle School (PK-8th) in Cherry Hill, Baltimore. He is also working on his Masters in Education at Johns Hopkins and is on track to receive a doctorate in five years.
Walker was drawn to the field of special education because of its relationship to inequity, and the situation that results from the over-diagnosing of students, particularly poor black students. “For gen-ed teachers, [labelling students with an IEP or Individualized Educational Program] is like code for ‘I don’t want to teach you, so I’m going to put you in another class,’ and this can happen as early as 1st grade,” said Walker. Once students are labeled as in need of special education, the effects of that label are difficult to reverse. For Walker, one of the important aspects of teaching special education is advocating for his students.
Teaching in low-income communities requires teachers to be very committed and invested in their students. Lila Stenson (‘17) appreciates the connections she’s been able to make with her students, “learning about their lives and telling them about mine.” Stenson graduated with a degree in Sociology and Spanish and is currently teaching 7th and 8th grade Spanish in Memphis, Tennessee. “It’s really fun to see [my students] grow and get excited when they can say new things in Spanish,” said Stenson.
Walker has also certainly become invested in his students. The Saturday after this interview, he was planning on taking one of his students to the movies because it was their birthday. “I’m a black male figure [in this student’s life], so we’re going to the movies,” Walker said. “On Friday, we’re going to celebrate with a cake.”
Because his special education classes are self-contained, Walker spends all day with the same nine students, who range from 5th grade to 8th grade. According to Walker, it is actually illegal to have over three grade levels together in the same class, but it often happens in Baltimore public schools because of understaffing. TFA works to combat understaffing in schools, but it is not enough. As Stenson states, TFA “really isn’t a long term solution to ending the problems in education.”

Goucher was among the top colleges and universities to contribute new members to the Teach For America 2017 corps. Photo Credit: Teach for America

Stenson became interested in education in part because of her experience working at a summer camp called Breakthrough Collaborative that works with students from under-resourced urban schools. Stenson’s experiences working in local schools through the Office of Community-Based Learning (CBL) added to this interest.
Walker also mentioned one of CBL’s programs, Middle School Mentoring, when talking about what influenced his decision to stay in Baltimore and teach. Both Stenson and Walker highlighted the way in which Goucher encourages students to engage with equity and social justice.
One thing that TFA corps members seem to have in common is their passion for what they do. “I think it is really cool to have a lot of new energy in the teaching field, as a lot of teachers who have been teaching for a while are burnt out,” Stenson wrote in an email interview.
However, because many of the applicants for TFA are young and inexperienced, they also face extra challenges. Stenson has twenty-seven students, which she said is actually a pretty small number compared to some of her coworkers’ classes. She is fortunate to teach a subject (Spanish) that is not tested at the state level, because it comes with more freedom. On the flip side, however, there is also no pre-prepared curriculum for her to use. “I did not major in education and while TFA does pack a lot into their summer training institute, you are still pretty unprepared for teaching everyday on your own. Classroom management and behavior issues are something that I struggle a lot with,” Stenson wrote.
Eliezer (EC) Cartagena (‘18), who did study education and was one of the juniors who applied early to TFA last year, critiqued this aspect of TFA. “TFA tries to train teachers in the summer, which is literally impossible. A lot of people will be woefully unprepared,” said Cartagena.
Cartagena also critiqued the fact that many people use TFA as “a stepping stone,” and move on to other careers. Cartagena emphasizes that students need consistency. “Two years seems like an injustice,” he said.
While many TFA alums move on to other careers, there are also TFA alums who stay in the world of education. As Walker points out, some of the biggest changemakers in Baltimore public schools, the principals of “turnaround schools,” are TFA alums. Cartagena hopes to stay in the school system for at least four years, while Walker sees himself continuing to teach ten years from now.
One of the incentives for applying to TFA are the benefits that come with the program. In addition to offering the opportunity to become certified to teach, TFA offers a summer training institute, an extensive alumni network, affinity group networks with other TFA members, mentor partnerships, and online location guides. TFA also has partnerships with graduate schools. Regional programs either require or encourage TFA corps members to work towards a Masters in Education. Fellowships and awards are also available to help teachers get a financial boost. For Stenson, who was moving to an entirely new city, she appreciated having the support network that came with TFA. “Memphis is a new home, so it is nice to have other people who are new and trying to explore the city as well,” she said.
TFA tries to draw a diverse group of members, and they advertised that their 2017 corps was more diverse than ever. Cartagena highlighted that TFA considers diversity factors besides race, like gender identity and sexual orientation. Walker also mentioned the diversity of educational backgrounds of corps members: “you’ll meet people from across the gamut, from Harvard, Stanford, from your local community college.”
However, despite their diversity of backgrounds, many teachers will face the same challenges. “Teachers are overworked and undervalued, and you need to be really dedicated, because financially you won’t get much from it,” said Cartagena. “Only apply if you’re really passionate about making change happen in school systems.”
Stenson emphasized the importance of flexibility and adaptability. “Things will not run smoothly, materials will not be available, school schedules and student behavior are always unpredictable,” she said. “A lot of this experience is just trying to roll with things.” Walker seconded this. “If administration emails me tonight and says, ‘we’re teaching in the dark tomorrow,’ then I’ll say, ‘okay, I’ll bring a flashlight,’” he said. Walker suggested that teachers should have a “growth mindset”–not just believing that their students can grow, but that, as teachers, they can, too. “You can’t enter the classroom thinking about what happened yesterday,” he said.
Overall, Goucher’s recent graduates who are members of the TFA corps seem proud of the work they’re doing. “It’s a noble profession,” said Walker.
For the 2018-2019 school year, there are a number of TFA application deadlines approaching, through March 2018. If you are interested in applying, Cartagena, who asked several people to look over his application, advises other students not to be afraid to ask for help. “People think that they have to do things on their own, but that’s not true,” he said.
For assistance with the application, students can also take advantage of on-campus resources like the Career Development Office.

CDO Student Profile: Brett Rapkin-Citrenbaum

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Brett Rapkin-Citrenbaum. Photo Credit: Brett Rapkin-Citrenbaum

STUDENT PROFILE: Brett Rapkin-Citrenbaum

CDO: We’re talking to Brett Rapkin-Citrenbaum, class of 2020. Brett, let’s start out on a serious note. What two animals would be combined to become you?

Brett: Bear Cub and Caterpillar

CDO: And what’s your major?

Brett: Political Science and International Relations

CDO: How did you go about choosing a major?

Brett: I took a bunch of intro classes to test out the waters, then I looked into the requirements of each major and tried to gauge what I’d like to take. I talked extensively to my advisor and some upperclassmen friends and by the end of it all it seemed obvious!

CDO: In what ways have you utilized the CDO team/resources?

Brett: The CDO helped me find a summer job in my town that was relevant to my career path. They also helped me format my resume and taught me some cool resume tricks for the future. (Note from the CDO: We did not pay her to say this!)

CDO: What has been the result, to date, of being proactive in your career development?

Brett:  I had a fun summer job at an environmental education center which is something I’m passionate about. I also feel a lot more confident looking for internships and applying for career focused positions.

CDO: How do you reduce and manage the stress that can come with being a busy college student?

Brett: Make time for fun! Even if it’s just a quick Stimson lunch with some pals or a walk in the woods or a quick game of chess.

CDO: What do you think Goucher students MUST KNOW about…

o    Choosing a major:

Brett: If you are planning on going to a grad school of some kind your major isn’t super relative. Just take classes you’re interested in and see where it leads you!

o    Getting involved on-campus:

Brett: Do it! Whether you’re attending the student government open meetings or common hour happenings, participating in academic events, or joining clubs. Also, make sure you’re taking part in all the student to administration conversations! These happen during Mobile Dean or common hour or even via email or on Van Meter Highway, but keep your eyes peeled!

o    Gaining work experience:

Brett: Goucher has a lot of resources, specifically at the CDO, but also within the academic departments. Ask your advisor for help!

Thanks to Brett for sharing her insight! Have some perspective about majors, careers, resume writing, etc. you would like to share with the Goucher community? Write to us at Career@goucher.edu!

Goucher Abuzz With Recent Honey Extraction

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The Beekeeping Club extracted more than 20 pound of honey earlier this semester. Photo credit: Mitchell Moran-Kaplan

It’s not every day you see a swarm of bodies, swaddled in what look to be white fencing suits, huddled outside your campus library. These bodies move quietly, slowly; thick gloves cover their hands and large screened masks hide their faces like fencers prepared to compete. But they aren’t fencers, they’re beekeepers. Their gloved hands work delicately to inspect their hives. Clumps of honeycomb stick to the frames of the hive boxes where masses of bees swirl. The beekeepers lift these frames out of the decoratively blue and yellow painted boxes for a clear inspection of the hive’s health.

This is Goucher College’s Beekeeping Club. Co-presidents Olivia Baud and Virginia Turpin started the club in 2015 with the help of English faculty member, Marjorie Pryse. “We have been very lucky because the administration is very supportive of us and allows us to have them [the bees]. Not all colleges are down with bees,” Turpin explained.

The club started off this academic year strong with its first ever honey extraction. The campus was abuzz with the news as honey-craving students, staff, and faculty members reached out to get their hands on a jar. “They delivered the first jars to President Bowen, Vice President Coker, Professor Kicklighter, and Matt Harmin – all of whom had been very supportive of the club in one way or another,” Pryse explained.

The club currently has four hives. At the beginning of this past summer, they added special honey storage boxes, called honey supers, to the two healthiest hives that would be most likely to produce an excess of honey. The excess honey would be stored in the honey super, which could then be removed from the hive box to extract the honey while still leaving enough for the hive to survive. During an inspection in late summer, the club leaders determined that there was enough honey collected in one honey super for an extraction to take place.

“So what we do is we take out the frames with honey. We take a really big knife – looks like a butter knife – and we cut the top of the comb to let the honey flow out,” Fiona Rutgers, the club’s treasurer, explained. “We then put it in an extractor, which is like a centrifuge that can fit frames, and we run that which lets the honey flow out, which we collect at the bottom of the extractor. We put the honey through a filter, and voila! The finished product!”

The extraction took place at Marjorie’s house, about fifteen minutes away from campus. The honey super, which is separate from the rest of the hive containing larvae, was removed from the hive and transported to Marjorie’s garage without disturbing or transporting any bees. The extraction needed to take place off campus due to the current campus construction that limits the  calm and spacious atmosphere necessary for an extraction. The club leaders, along with one active club member, were able to join Marjorie for the extraction. The process was live-streamed in a Facebook video for the rest of the club members and Goucher’s community to experience.

“We did the extraction, and that was very exciting because that was kind of the goal, the objective Virginia and I had from the start.” Baud said. “It was like, if we get to do an extraction, that will mean we have succeeded in some ways in establishing and maintaining this club. So that was a really momentous event for us.”

Baud, Turpin, and Pryse first bonded over their interest in beekeeping in the fall of 2015. “One of my objectives, coming into Goucher, was actually starting a beekeeping club.” Baud explains, “It was my sophomore or junior year of high school that I read a book by Sue Monk Kidd called The Secret Life of Bees. And the way it portrayed beekeeping and bees in the book really enchanted me.” Her interest connected with Turpin’s when they met in a biology class at Goucher. Their biology professor, Dr. Cynthia Kicklighter, then got them in touch with Marjorie Pryse.

“The Club…benefits from an energetic board of officers. They have generated significant response among students, always ‘sell out’ hive inspection opportunities, and have been very creative in expanding the kinds of activities the Club generates for its members.” Pryse said.

Pryse, Baud, and Turpin spent the 2015-2016 academic year meeting with campus members from Facilities, Public Safety, and the Office of Finance. They needed to decide where to place the hives on campus. “We wanted a site that would both benefit the bees and also – even more importantly – protect students and the general public,” Pryse explained. Furthermore, the club needed to find a space that could provide ample sun; access to forage, which consists of plants and wildflowers that produce pollen and nectar; and proximity to water. “We eventually chose the current site-outside the wall of the Athenaeum that faces the rain garden and loop road- because it met all our requirements. In addition, the apiary stands close to the Co-op Garden, and it is ideal to have synergy between bees and vegetable gardens.”

By spring 2016, the first two hives were established and the Beekeeping Club gained momentum. “We had an event with club members…we wanted to make it a kind of Goucher pride type of event so we painted the boxes blue and yellow.” Baud said. That first semester the club had over 80 people signed up for its email list, and a growing number of students wanting to take part in hive inspections.

Hive inspections are limited by the amount of protective gear the club has. “We used to have only six suits. But we just got some new equipment!” Baud explained. “We base it [hive inspections] around the protective equipment because we absolutely cannot let people go in without some sort of protection. That’s just legally smart to do that.” Each member of an inspection needs to be completely covered with a suit, gloves, and a veil. There are even elastic bands that tighten around the suit’s pant legs to securely protect the entire body.

Inspections are done every two weeks or so, depending on the season. The hives are largely left alone in the winter months to avoid disturbing the bees in the cold weather. When inspections do take place, Baud explained, “the first thing you want to look for is disease, and usually that’s pretty noticeable.” The beekeepers also look at general hive wellbeing involving the larvae and honey production.

Club members take turns inspecting the hive. Photo credit: Mitchell Moran-Kaplan

Turpin said, “We do need at least one person with some amount of expert knowledge to lead the sessions. For us, that’s Marjorie Pryse. It would be very hard to do this without her help.”

Baud explained, “Marjorie, she’s so modest…but she’s been a huge help for the club. And in all honesty I don’t know if we would’ve come this far if it weren’t for her support.”

Pryse became a beekeeper before she came to Goucher in Fall 2015. “I kept bees in Ithaca, New York, for about six years under the mentorship of a local master beekeeper and working with an area beekeeping club.” From her past experiences, Pryse was able to provide some of the preliminary equipment when the club first started at Goucher, and furthermore has continued to offer her knowledge and guidance to the club members.

“I have never before had as much fun keeping bees as I do now, keeping bees with student beekeepers. It is such a delight to watch the Club introduce newbies to bees and to watch the more experienced members become increasingly comfortable and knowledgeable working with these insects that so many people unfortunately have learned to fear,” Pryse said.

Goucher’s Beekeeping Club is a member of the Maryland Beekeeper’s Association, through which the club was able to purchase some of its hives and connect to a larger beekeeping community. According to Bee Culture Magazine, most colleges and universities that keep bees tend to be larger state schools where the bees are kept in various entomology departments or research labs. The University of Maryland’s Department of Entomology has a Honey Bee Lab, through which they can conduct apiculture research.

Baud explained, “I think there is something to be said about how disconnected we are from nature and from things like honeybees because we aren’t used to being exposed them in our present, modern world.” Goucher’s campus is unique with its spacious greenery. It also has a community of administrators, staff, and students who support, or at the very least tolerate, beekeepers promoting awareness of bees by actually maintaining hives on campus. With the recent honey extraction, the community has even more of a reason to support the bees and their dedicated keepers.

“The Club…extracted more than 20 pounds of honey,” Pryse said. 20 pounds didn’t meet the demand on campus, so club leaders designed a raffle system for the distribution process.

“A big concern for the club was finding a way to distribute honey in the most equitable way,” Rutgers said. “The raffle was a way for us to give everyone a chance to buy.” Community members had the opportunity to email the club to enter their names into the raffle. From there, the club used an algorithmic-based website to randomly select the winners. There were 22 jars in total that were sold through this process, at ten dollars a jar.

Before the jars were ready for distribution, labels had to be made. “We decided to open up a label-drawing contest and decided that the winner would receive a jar of honey,” Baud said. She, Turpin, and Rutgers all privately ranked their top three choices of the submissions they received. Luckily, they all agreed on their final choice, a design created by student, Erin Ertunga. The honey distribution just took place this week.

With the club’s success over its first two years, Baud has long-term visions for the club’s role on campus, including providing awareness to campus members that honeybees should not be feared. “My hope is that people who don’t feel comfortable around bees, that we’ll be able to reach out to those people, and they don’t even have to participate, but get them to witness a hive inspection. Because I think even just getting to witness one can really help dissipate the irrational fear of honeybees.”

This Month In Goucher History

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View from Catherine Hooper Hall on the original campus. Photo credit: Goucher College Digital Archives

 

101 years ago, Goucher students met to discuss article ideas for the first November issue of the Goucher College Weekly – the very beginnings of yours truly, The Quindecim. In some ways, the topics they chose to write about reflected the same fall spirit we have today. Halloween was as much a cause for celebration then as it is now. Parties held at Goucher included bobbing for apples, dancing, “orchestral selections”, and refreshments. Yet, students at the time did not parade their costumes down Van Meter or scavenge through Heubeck. In fact, Van Meter and Heubeck Hall would not come to being until several decades later, when Goucher moved to its present location. Instead, the all-female student body celebrated Halloween in places like Vingolf Hall, part of an original campus located on 23rd and St. Paul Street, Baltimore. Examining one of The Q‘s earliest issues, I invite you to discover a universe both familiar and strange by traveling back to a Goucher of the past.

A politically charged environment defined November of 1916 as the U.S. held its 33rd presidential election. While women had not yet obtained suffrage in the country (the 19th Amendment would not be ratified until 1920), Goucher students expressed a strong civic spirit. A very successful campaign rally was organized in the college gymnasium, Catherine Hooper Hall, where anyone could hear “remnants of campaign songs and powerful yells of ‘Wilson, Wilson!’ and ‘Hughes, Hughes!’”. Goucher women impersonated the two main political candidates, Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic, presidential incumbent, and Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican nominee, arguing their case and explaining their platform. Apparently, a few students supporting the Socialist and Prohibition nominees (Newspaper editor, Allan L Benson and ex-Governor of Louisiana, J. Frank Hanley, respectively) “united forces [and] loudly proclaimed the merits of both candidates, yelling with admirable impartiality, ‘Ice-cream, soda-water, ginger-ale, pop; Benson, Benson always on top;’ followed by, ‘Wipe out the booze hop, every one.’”

Women’s suffrage parade in Baltimore. Photo credit: Goucher College Digital Archives

Prohibition in particular shaped political discussions on campus. “About sixty undergraduates and ten members of the faculty” marched in a Prohibition parade that was held in Baltimore on November 4th. The Prohibition Party had been the first to accept women into its fold and had been used as a platform to both advance restrictions on the sale of alcohol and to advocate for women’s rights. In many ways, the two objectives overlapped- women of the early 20th century were largely confined to the home where the consequences of drunkenness were often experienced. It was with this intersection in mind that Dr. Hogue addressed Goucher women in the chapel, urging them to fight for prohibition. According to the results of a straw vote, 460 Goucher students supported prohibition and 46 were against it. Interestingly, in the same vote, 416 students claimed to support suffrage while 90 claimed to be opposed.

While Goucher women seemed preoccupied with domestic politics for the most part, one former student pointed to an important international political context. While the US would not officially join the Allies until 1917, WWI had long been underway in Europe. Hilda C Rodway, presumably a British student who had attended Goucher, hinted at this in a letter addressed to her friends and peers. “I am fully occupied at a military hospital in Liverpool… It certainly makes one realize what war is when one is surrounded all day with its awful results.”

It appears that, because war was still a whole ocean away, students remained blissfully ignorant of its devastation. Or at least, they avoided mentioning it in any article published in the November issue of 1916. Instead, the everyday topics covered by the rest of the articles in the issue communicated a sense of normality. One student wrote in complaint of the continuous reminders to comply with college rules, “We are so tired of listening to ‘Be good’ lectures!” A mysterious public service announcement on one page stated, “Goucher College Book Store. If you do not see what you want, ask William.” Finally, the issue ended with three separate sports features describing an apparently noteworthy defeat of the Senior class in a tennis match against the Junior class. Were it not for the corset ads interspersed between the articles, you could almost imagine yourself back in 2017.

The CDO’s Etiquette Dinner

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Do you like food, learning, and networking? If your answer is yes, which I am sure it is, the Career Development Office’s annual Etiquette Dinner is just the right event for you.

Every fall semester, the CDO, with generous support from the Goucher Student Government, coordinates the Etiquette Dinner. The purpose of this dinner is to teach students the fine art of dining while in a professional setting. The CDO invites an etiquette specialist from the International School of Protocol to guide students into gaining confidence in their ability to successfully navigate a professional cocktail, lunch, or dinner experience. Over a three-course meal, the dining instructor covers both American and Continental dining methods to allow for diverse knowledge of dining etiquette, including the proper use of chopsticks. This is especially beneficial to Goucher students pursuing an international career focus and for those who may be studying abroad in the future.

The event is open to the Goucher student community, with priority given to juniors and seniors, since those are the years that students are most commonly focusing on networking, seeking employment, and other formal opportunities. The event can host around 40-45 students, with room for the alumnae/i table hosts. By inviting Goucher alums, from a variety of educational and industry backgrounds, to serve as table hosts, the students who attend are allowed an opportunity to practice their networking skills first hand and learn tips from these alums to apply as they finish their college career.

The dinner provides an opportunity for students to learn about and practice business dining etiquette, as well as professional networking. In today’s job market, these skills are incredibly helpful for students to learn as they build their contacts and make a strong impression with employers. Registration opened Oct. 23rd through the CDO website and runs until Nov. 1: www.goucher.edu/cdo.

BY: ZULA MUCYO

Staying In-Style With Aubin

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Photo Credit: Aubin Niragira

Who: Aubin Niragira, ’20, from Jersey City, NY

Q: What are you wearing today, Aubin?

A: I’m wearing this sweater that’s not thick enough. And then these pants are from my dad, from like the 90s. It’s a little bit big on me but close enough. I actually waited quite some time to be able to wear his clothes. You can tell when clothes are pretty old and I kind of like that, but [my dad] prefers that I wear new clothes.

Q: Do you thrift?

A: Sometimes… it’s not as cheap as what you would think it would be because it’s become a trend, so now it’s more expensive. The other day I went to [a thrift store] in New York called L Train Vintage. I was expecting it to be cheap, but it was extremely expensive, so I got absolutely nothing.

Q: How have you been been dressing for these fluctuating temperatures?

A: I try to start the day off with more layers than I need. I try to stack up on layers and then slowly take them off. But I don’t always do that. Like I didn’t today. I do have this denim jacket that I could honestly wear every single day. It works with most things, and even if it’s hot out it still works. It’s pretty versatile.

Q: What inspires your fashion?

A: I get a lot of inspiration from Instagram. I feel like Instagram is somewhat about showing off, you know? Also just the way people pair things together is something I see on Instagram.

Q: Do you use Instagram to capture your own style?

A: It used to be about just picking up on fashion but now I’m using it to show off my style. It’s kind of stressful, actually, because then I hold myself up to a high standard – but I’m trying to do that less. I follow some random, really upscale brands like Versace. Like I could never buy their stuff, but the silhouette of things and the way that they pair things could apply to regular streetwear.

Q: If you could describe your style in one word, what would it be?

A: I would say, like lately, it would be pretty… simple or minimalistic, ’cause I’ve been wearing a lot of black and white. Which is different to what I used to wear because I used to wear a lot of bright colors. I didn’t notice that I was making the change until recently when I looked in my closet and thought I was just really good at matching, but then realized that I just had black and white clothes.

Q: Tell me about that fur coat that you wore at Gala last year.

A: I got it my Sophomore year of high school. It was actually just a joke at first. I went thrift shopping with my friends and it was around the time that Macklemore’s song came out. Then it ended up being very warm. I actually had kind of a scare ’cause I was smoking a cig and some ash got on it and it’s very flammable, but it ended up being fine. It’s not real fur – I got that question a lot.

Poses with Penguins- Yoga at the Zoo

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Yoga at the Zoo has become a twice monthly event at the Baltimore Zoo. Photo Credit: Maryland Zoo

More and more people gather in front of the gates of the Baltimore Zoo. It’s 7:45, and the zoo won’t open to the public until 10. It’s mostly women in groups of two to three. There are a few stragglers who awkwardly stare at phone screens and yawn as they wait for the gates to open. There are two or three men in the whole ensemble, one of whom seems to be the father of a family that came to practice together.  As the clock moves closer to 8, more and more people arrive.

At about 8:05, Baltimore Zoo staff open the gates and usher the crowd of about forty people into the park. The sun is brilliant when they arrive to their destination: the zoo’s Penguin Pavilion. People walk towards the open space and place their mats on the concrete. There are large speakers set up around the area, and a woman right at the front of the penguin enclosure speaks:

“Hi, everyone! Welcome to Yoga at the Zoo! We’ll get started soon.”

Yoga at the Zoo has become a twice monthly event at the Baltimore Zoo. The event consists of a hour-long Vinyasa flow class open to all skill levels.  Occurring before the zoo opens for regular operations, the practice takes place outdoors by the zoo’s penguin enclosures. Yoga at the Zoo is still a relatively new event, only having been started this year.

“It started with a test date back in the spring,” says Jane Ballentine, Director of Public Relations at the Baltimore Zoo.

“I think there were about sixty people that decided it was going to be a fun thing to do, and they loved it so much that the Event Department decided, ‘well, let’s make a series out of it, and do it over the summer, and see how it goes.’ And people liked it so much and it was selling out that they decided to extend it into the fall.”

“Since [April] we’ve added two classes a month, and we’re going to do two classes a month through December, and then we’ll announce the new classes for the next year,” says Steve Rosenfeld, Assistant Vice President of Institutional Advancement at the Zoo.

“It’s been a really really popular event. Throughout the summer most of the classes have been sold out. So it’s been really popular; people seem to really respond to it,” says Kate Rosenfeld, who taught the class.

Yoga at the Zoo started as somewhat of a personal project for zoo event officials. It was actually Steve Rosenfeld’s wife who inspired the project. “His wife got into yoga a few years ago, and during just random discussions of the zoo, looking for something new, something different to do, somebody suggested ‘Well, why don’t we do yoga,’ ” says Jane Ballentine. “It was like, ‘no, how’s that gonna work? It seems kind of silly, no one is going to want to come here,’ then he actually started talking to his wife, and some of her colleagues that she does yoga with and they were like, ‘We should give this a try! We’ll test it out.’ ”

The class costs ten dollars for zoo members, and 20 dollars for non-members. Aside from the class, purchasers also receive a full day pass for the zoo and a complimentary drink from event sponsor Truly Spiked & Sparkling (only for participants 21+ with valid ID). Also, after the practice, zoo-goers can meet an official Penguin Ambassador (a penguin trained to take photos with zoo-goers). “It’s 19 dollars to get into the zoo already. So it’s only an extra dollar to take a yoga class and spend a day at the zoo,” Steve Rosenfeld emphasizes.

After the practice, many participants seem energetic. Several rush to take pictures with the Penguin Ambassador that is brought out, some rush to the beverages while chatting about the heat. Many groups talk about what enclosures they want to go see first.

“I enjoyed it a lot. It’s the second time I’ve came. Very relaxing, I like it,” says Lisa Brunsinski, who came with a co-worker.

“It’s actually my birthday tomorrow, and my boyfriend bought tickets for it,” says Jackie Deworth. “It was a fun event, and it was a really great practice.”

There are some concerns about the seasonal nature of the event, however.  The class occurs on one of the viewing platforms near the penguin enclosure, and so far, cold weather plans haven’t had a chance to be fully tested. “It will be different once it’s colder out, because right now you can do it outside. Although there’s always a rain plan to move into the Penguin Education Center, which is a great space, [though] it’s not as large as this and it’s a little broken up,” says Ballentine.  “It won’t be the same experience, but it will still be really cool. And the penguins swim by as you’re doing it, ‘cause it has underwater viewing. So it will still be a fun experience.”

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