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Club Chat: Anime Club

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Some clubs are about working up a sweat, and some are about creating new things. This week, let’s look at an organization that’s all about relaxing and hanging out with people who share the same kind of interests: Goucher’s own Anime and Animation Club. I talked to Katelyn Pringle (‘18) president and founder.

What is your club’s general purpose?

We want to bring together anime and animation enthusiasts on campus, so we can discuss current trends, recommend stuff to each other, and sometimes go out and attend conventions to try and support the industry.

How do you work structurally?

At the beginning of every year, everyone gets to make three suggestions, and we put them into a drawing pile. So it’s completely random. Every meeting we watch two anime – not counting the one we follow throughout the semester- and one cartoon. Last week we watched the very first episode of Tom and Jerry.

We meet on Sundays at noon. It’s usually an after brunch deal. We meet in Ath 322.

What gave you the idea too start the club?

When I was in high school, I was president of the anime club. I thought there was going to be one here- and there was- but it was disbanded. I decided I could be the president – I did it before.

What are your plans this coming semester?

We are watching a show throughout the semester: Mononoke, which is a horror anthology. It’s really cool! It’s got some great, trippy animation. We are also going to go to Universal FanCon, which is a Baltimore convention in April. I was hoping to have one last movie screening, but I’m not sure if that will happen. We had one last semester, it was for the cartoon network mini series Over the Garden Wall.

Why should people join?

There’s a lot of different organizations on campus: about doing good things and making the world a better place, and that’s great and fantastic, but sometimes you just want to watch some cartoons. And sometimes you just want to meet other people who watch them too. Have you ever met an anime fan? They’re insane: we need each other.

And that’s that for this installment of club chat! Interested in having your organization featured in the next issue of the Q? Email me at firut001@mail.goucher.edu for your chance to be in the next edition!

Feature Image Credit: Google Images

Spring Break

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It’s nearing that time of the semester where students are getting ready for Spring Break 2018. Will they be going home? Are they going on a family trip somewhere close? Or do will they have the typical movie-like spring break and party it up on the coast of Florida? As we near our mid-semester break, I thought it would be nice to ask around and see what people will be up to, and maybe this will inspire others to do something similar!

“This year, I will be driving to Virginia with six friends and will be doing many hikes in Shenandoah National Park, as well as staying in an Airbnb.” -Noah Block (’21).

“Two friends and I are driving from Goucher to Nantucket Island to stay with my aunt, uncle, and grandmother. We’re planning on leaving our days open to adventure, like walking on the beach, no matter how cold it is, and exploring the island a little bit.” -Maddy Hawkes (’21).

“For Spring Break, I get to go home! I will be spending time with my family, and most excitingly, will be getting my wisdom teeth out.”- Lily Mikolajczyk (’21)

As you can see, many of us will be staying on the East Coast, especially those who have their homes out here. This spring break may even be the best one of your life so far. Why not make plans to go somewhere fun with friends? Or go on an adventure and visit some place you have never been before? Here are some cool ideas from people traveling outside the east coast for spring break:

“I am going back home to Northern California and a few friends and I are going to go on a road trip south to Santa Barbara. We are going to make various stops along the coast on our way down, and drive Pacific Coast Highway.” Antonia Pettit (’20).

“For spring break this year, I will be travelling to Los Angeles, California, with the Women’s Lacrosse team to play a few games, bond with my new teammates, and have a few fun adventures, one of which will be going to Six Flags.” Maya Bass (’21).

“I’m going to Fort Myers and will be visiting my grandfather and his girlfriend. While there, I plan on visiting many beaches, getting in as many hikes as possible, and exploring the area on my bike. Most importantly, I’m excited to be in the warm weather, and to be able to catch some rays and get a bit more tan for the second half of the semester.” –Amelia Meier (’21).

California seems like a popular place to venture to for break.The  Sunny coast, warmth, and great people, make it an overall good place to be in late March/ early April, especially when the east coast seems to be wanting to stay chilly and full of rain and snow. All in all, everyone tends to have a good spring break, no matter what they’re off to do. So make this one count!

By Juliana Block

News From the CDO: Calling ALL Students

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From the CDO

Time to SPRING FORWARD into planning your summer career experience!

Whether you are seeking an internship, summer job, or you’re a graduating senior looking for a full-time experience, it’s time to get started—opportunities await! And, the CDO is here to help every step of the way. Check-out tips and resources below for a couple of ways you could use Spring Break to your advantage!

5 Internship & Job Search Tips to Maximize Your Spring Break!

1. Articulate Your Interests & Skills  

  • Take time to identify (and write down) what you know so far about the skills and experiences you bring to your next career step.
  • Jot down what you know so far about the types of opportunities that might be of interest—duties, job titles, industries, organizations, locations.
  • If unsure about a career direction, complete the quick Traitify assessment for personality insights and recommended job titles to help get you started (available on the CDO homepage, when on the Goucher network).

2. Update Your Resume & Cover Letter

3. Develop a Plan

  • Develop a system to track where you have searched, who you’ve connected with, your applications, and follow-up/next steps to stay organized.
  • Develop a prospect list of organizations in which you are interested or want to learn more about, and review their websites for opportunities.
  • Check for internship and job openings on Goucher Recruit and through other websites (e.g. LinkedIn, Baltimore Collegetown Network, Google Jobs, Indeed, Idealist), professional associations, and personal contacts.
  • If interested in registering for academic credit for your internship experience, review the Internship Learning Agreement (ILA) on the CDO website. Remember that the Goucher Intern Fellowship funds are available to support summer internships! Find out more at http://www.goucher.edu/career-development-office/for-students/internships/. *If you’re still trying to get credit for a spring internship, note the deadline is March 30, 2018.

4. Network, network, network!

  • Start with who you know! Over break, ask your friends, family, and mentors questions about jobs, careers, experiences, and for suggestions of other contacts with whom they could connect you.
  • Conduct informational interviews to explore career fields and jobs by connecting with professionals in your field(s) of interest.
  • Use the Alumni Career Coaches tab in Goucher Recruit to search and message alumni who have volunteered to help YOU learn more about careers through their experiences and insights.
  • Create (or update) a LinkedIn profile to build your connections (alumni, faculty, staff, friends, family, colleagues, neighbors, teammates). Don’t forget to check-out the Jobs tab to search for opportunities!

5. Prepare for Interviews

  • Practice crafting and telling stories that showcase your skills and experiences.
  • Review commonly asked interview questions and prepare your answers.
  • For specific interviews, research the organization to which you are applying and spend time comparing your skills and qualifications to the job requirements.
  • Review CDO interview prep resources at http://www.goucher.edu/career-development-office/for-students/job-search/.

Don’t forget, the CDO is here to help and we look forward to connecting with you!

We meet with students year round, even over breaks, through scheduled appointments (on the CDO homepage @ www.goucher.edu/cdo) and drop-ins from 2pm-4pm Monday-Friday (just stop by!).

Follow us on social media- Facebook @GoucherCollegeCDO, and Twitter @CDOGoucher to keep up with all that’s happening at the CDO.

Feature Image Credit: Goucher College

Problems Within the #MeToo Movement

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In 2006, Tarana Burke founded the Me Too movement. The movement aims to create a community and support system for sexual assault survivors. This platform allows for survivors to share their stories in the public eye, accompanied by the hashtag #MeToo, with the purpose of informing the public and empowering survivors. The sharing of these stories allows for the public to be informed of the magnitude of the issue, while recognizing the personal impact it has on individuals, in order to begin an entire societal shift to change the current state of the sexual violence epidemic. In addition to informing the public, the movement allows for survivors to recognize they are not alone, feel more comfortable coming forward with their own stories, feel empowered to break their silence, and ultimately find a starting point to begin the healing process. Tarana’s ideology behind the movement is “empowerment through empathy”.

In October of last year, actress Alyssa Milano tweeted, “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet.” Within 24 hours, there were over 12 million posts and interactions involving #MeToo. To the millions involving themselves with the trending hashtag, Alyssa Milano had seemingly started a movement. What was ignored was Tarana Burke’s movement, under the same name and ideology, that had been founded ten years earlier. Burke was shocked to see Milano’s tweet and the explosion of #MeToo, stating, “Initially I panicked. I felt a sense of dread, because something that was part of my life’s work was going to be co-opted and taken from me and used for a purpose that I hadn’t originally intended” (qtd. in Garcia). The widespread popularity of this movement being initiated by a white, famous woman, without the credit given to the actual founder, a black woman, creates an inherent issue with the hashtag that leaves women of color out of the conversation, while the spotlight is held over famous, white cisgender women.

Another group that remains marginalized by the #MeToo movement are trans and non-binary identifying people. First, the language involved in the movement, with the usage of “women and femme”, centers the conversation around the gender binary. This frames the dialogue as a cis men vs. cis women issue, leaving trans/non-binary people out of the conversation. Trans women are still not viewed as women in many circles of society, and as a result, their stories are often invalidated, pushed to the side and ignored. Last year, on RuPaul’s podcast Whats The Tee?, Rose McGowan, actress, Weinstein accuser and an active member in the #MeToo movement, said, “They [trans women] assume because they felt like a woman on the inside . . . That’s not developing as a woman. That’s not growing as a woman, that’s not living in this world as a woman.” If people with power involved in the movement perpetuate the idea of trans women not being women and invalidating their experiences, this idea will also embed itself in the movement. “Welcome to womanhood” is a phrase trans women are often met with when they come forward with their experiences of sexual violence (Mamone), rather than being met with support, as cis women are. Many trans and GNC people do not feel comfortable participating in this conversation because of the fear of the lack of support they will receive, or even backlash. They also don’t feel comfortable asserting themselves into the conversation because they do not see themselves represented in the conversation. No trans/gender nonconforming people were featured in Time Magazine’s profile of the #MeToo “SilenceBreakers” last year.

The #MeToo movement ignores the fact that trans and gender non-conforming people experience the greatest amount of violence due to gender. According the the National Center for Transgender Equality, “47 percent of trans people say they experienced sexual violence sometime during their lives” (qtd. in Talusan). Not only are trans people at risk of unwanted sexual advances, but they are also at greater risk of physical assault and murder because of their identity. Intersectional journalist, Meredith Talusan, discusses how the MeToo hashtag only aims to help cis women, as the experiences of trans and GNC people are not brought to the forefront, even though they experience the greatest oppression. Talusan states, ”We continue to be footnotes in discussions of gender-based violence, even when we’re the most affected.”

While the #MeToo movement leaves women of color, trans women and non-binary people out of the conversation, the structure and goal of the conversation itself may not even help to make a change within our society. Although the movement absolutely has the potential to bring a sense of solidarity to victims, an issue lies with the movement’s goal of raising awareness of the problem. Wagatwe Sara Wanjuki describes this issue:

“”Me, too” is framed as an attempt to convince people that sexual violence is a problem. It implies that sexual violence is pervasive simply because (mostly) men don’t understand that it’s so prevalent, which I don’t believe. It reinforces the idea
that if there are enough numbers on your side, then we should believe and listen. One victim should be enough for us to care. One survivor is already too many. Listening and believing survivors is great, but it should be the first step of many in doing our part to end sexual violence. We need everyone to participate in raising awareness and taking concrete actions against rape culture, rather than leaving it to survivors to do the heavy lifting.”

The #MeToo movement places the work on the survivors; relying on them to come forward with their stories in order to initiate change in society. The problem lies within the abusers, and we must target them directly to initiate change. We must also work to put the most marginalized groups, women of color, trans and gender non-conforming people, at the forefront of the

conversation. Problems will exist within any movement, and it is important to examine and address the issues head-on in order to create a more inclusive, intersectional, and successful movement.

Feature Image Credit: Google Images

Poetry as Community

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It is not so frequent an event that speakers are introduced as having created oceans. Oceans with “clear and clean water,” into which one can be submersed, “with no part left dry.”
On Thursday, February 15th, poets Airea D. Matthews and Ladan Osman visited Goucher for an evening of dinner, conversation, and, most importantly, poetry. They were the first in a series of poets whose visits will be sponsored by the Kratz Center for Creative Writing at Goucher College.

Airea D Matthews and Ladan Osman.
Photo Credit: Goucher College Events Calendar

Typically, the Kratz Center sponsors one visiting writer event in the fall semester. For example, last semester Elizabeth Strout made a visit, and in previous years, other big names like Sherman Alexie, Seamus Heaney, and W.S. Merwin have come to Goucher. Then, in the spring semester, the Kratz Center sponsors a visiting writer to teach a course. This semester H.G. Carrillo is leading a fiction writing workshop. Goucher alumni Edgar Kunz is also visiting and teaching creative writing. In addition to these annually-run programs, however, the Kratz Center is also sponsoring something new this year—an “experiment,” in the words of Bill U’Ren, current Kratz Director and Goucher creative writing professor.
The Poetry Series is the experiment. Although U’Ren is the acting Kratz Director, the go-ahead for this experiment was given by last year’s co-directors Madison Smartt Bell and Elizabeth Spires. Meant to work in conjunction with this semester’s theme of “community,” the series involves creating several smaller events with visiting writers, rather than try to acquire big-ticket names. The series is also an attempt to organize a variety of readings which may not be the most traditional. For example, Matthews and Osman both employed mixed media presentations, using images along with their work. Future visiting poets include The Black Ladies Brunch Collective, a group of poets who work collaboratively.
Goucher poetry and peace studies professor Ailish Hopper was the curator of the series (and the author of the lovely introduction at the Thursday night event). As the curator, Hopper reached out to poets in the broader Baltimore community and asked for their help in creating the events. To create a pair for a joint reading, she would first contact one poet, and then ask whom that poet would like to read with, be it “a friend, or mentor or poetry-crush,” as Hopper put it. The poets were then asked what the phrase “poetry as community” meant to them. The focus, or subtitles, for each event, came from their answers to this question. Aptly, Hopper used a metaphor to describe her involvement as curator in this process: “I was like a sail on a sailboat, and all these winds came along to push the sail,” said Hopper, miming the movement of blowing winds to represent the various people who made the series possible.
At the event on Thursday, throughout the evening Matthews and Osman showed their friendship and respect for each other, each sharing stories about the other. At the end of the night, Hopper thanked both for their time, their poetry, and, ultimately, for their togetherness. Matthews and Osman laughed and looked at each other. “We really love each other,” said Matthews.
The Poetry Series has already been building connections between members of the poetry community. Of the 40-50 people at Thursday night event, there were a number of local poets, who teach in colleges, high schools, and after school programs. One outcome of this community-building is co-publicity and the creation of a master list of all the poetry events happening this spring. If you’re interested in attending poetry events on or off campus, click here for events and bios of the poets.
The final visiting poet of the semester, Rudy Francisco, who specializes in spoken word poetry, will lead a master class at Goucher in the morning but will perform in the evening at the DewMore Baltimore Poetry Festival. Hopper hopes that Goucher students connect with Francisco and make an effort to travel into the city for the festival.
Upcoming events at Goucher feature Poets Jenny Johnson and francine harris on March 29th, 7-9 in Batza Room and The Black Ladies Brunch Collective on Thursday, April 12th, 7-9, also in Batza.

A Brief Look at the History of Goucher’s Land

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In 1885, Goucher College was founded in Northern Baltimore as the Women’s College of Baltimore. It then was renamed Goucher College in 1910 to honor the contributions of Dr. John Goucher and his wife Mary Fisher Goucher. As early as 1914, the college sought to move out of Baltimore, due to the fact that “the character of the immediate neighborhood of the College was then beginning to change so rapidly.” The college purchased 421 acres of land in Towson in 1921. When the students first ventured to the Towson campus, the school newspaper described it as a visit where students “rambled for miles through the meadows, cornfields and woods that in a very few years will have been metamorphosed into the Academic Quadrangle, the Lake, Faculty Row, and everything else that one’s fondest dreams may suggest.”
The move was a time of great hope and anticipation, leading to a campaign where alumnae each raised $421 to fund the building of the new campus.

Goucher women visit the new campus in 1920s. Photo credit: Goucher College Archives

The land that became Goucher was originally owned by the Ridgely family as part of Hampton Estate. The Hampton Estate was one of the largest slave plantations in Maryland, before it was given by the family to their relatives, the Chew Family. The land then became the Epsom farm, which was still worked by slaves. When the college bought the land in Towson from the Chew family, it was stipulated in the deed that “that no part of said land or premises shall ever be leased, sold, transferred to or occupied by any person of the African Race; this provision, however, not to apply or include occupancy of servants, or employees of the owners of the premises.” Even after the sale, members of the college upheld a close neighborly relationship with the then owner of Hampton Estate, Captain Ridgely.
The move from Baltimore to Towson began in 1921 but was not completed until 1954, due to financial difficulties and building supply shortages during World War II. The 1950s was also a period during which white-flight was happening across the United States and in Baltimore, as white residents of cities moved out of the city center and into the suburbs and more people of color moved into the cities. In 1937, the Residential Security Map of Baltimore had been created, which is now known as a redlining map, meant to prevent the sale of property to people especially people or color and the poor who lived in certain geographic areas, particularly those in the inner-city. In this map “desirable” mostly white neighborhoods were marked as green, while “undesirable” neighborhoods with high lending risk were marked red. Through this effort and through neighborhood covenants, people of color were excluded from living in certain neighborhoods and were refused housing loans and insurance. This map was created by a number of real estate brokers as well as with help from Ivan McDougal, Professor of Economics and Sociology at Goucher College.
In summation, the history of the campus is far more complicated than is regularly acknowledged. This information is all available from the Goucher archives, which can be found online at http://blogs.goucher.edu/digitallibrary/.
If you are interested in learning more about this history or simply discussing what you know about the history and how it affects the college today, please contact me (Sophia Hancock at sohan001@mail.goucher.edu)! I am currently conducting a research project on the history of the campus as a part of my Environmental Studies capstone project.

SOPHIA HANCOCK

Goucher Model U.N. Attends Harvard Conference

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Wake up! It’s 5:50 am and my alarm rings. My roommate just sleeps through it but I am on a mission. I shower, pack my suits and bowties, then head over to the Welsh kitchen. There I meet my team, my brothers and sisters in arms representing Mongolia at the Harvard Model United Nations conference. At Welsh, Alex, the club president, is making us crêpes with nutella, the breakfast of champions. We head off to the airport and fly to Boston.
After checking in at the hotel, a quick twenty-minute walk from the conference, we headed out to get burgers. While sitting with my fellow “Mongolian” delegates, we briefly discussed what was going to occur. This was the first time many of our team members’ participated in Model UN and even fewer of us had been to the Harvard conference before, so we had no idea what we were getting into. After realizing we had stayed in the burger joint too long, we ran a few blocks to get to the opening session on time.
We were struck by the sheer size of the conference. Close to three thousand students from over sixty countries were present. There we sat in the Grand Ballroom, ready to be awakened with a sense of passion, not for one’s country, but for humanity. People flew in from Venezuela, China, the Netherlands, Ghana, Peru, and many other countries. The previous US ambassador to Austria took the stage. She gave a rousing speech and a call to action to look beyond the dilemmas facing each individual nation, and to look at how we as a global community can work together to uplift us all. Then committee started.

This was the first time many of our team members’ participated in Model UN and even fewer of us had been to the Harvard conference before, so we had no idea what we were getting into. Credit: Google Images

I walked into a room of seventy people and immediately began schmoozing to see who would be my potential allies and enemies. The topic, violience against LGBTQ indivuals, was chosen. From there, representatives from various nations began speaking about how their country has attempted to solve the problem. Everyone wrote frantic notes to see who would support their ideas in a resolution. Writing resolutions is the key because these pieces of paper mimic real UN resolutions which push national governments in certain directions. Resolutions most of the time do not convey any hard power but they essentially are used to pressure nations towards moving in specific directions.
Things really started to pick up as we discussed ideas about education programs, better policing, hotlines, as well as many others. The meetings spilled into breakfast coffee runs where we were all frantically arguing and writing, making sure that our nation’s interests were represented. After three full days of arguing and negotiating it all came down to a vote.
There were four groups of countries each writing their own resolution, and I was working on two seperate ones, thinking that the two would merge. Instead of the two obvious mergers they instead merged with another resolution that I had no previous connection to, and I then became the ally of the only two opposing resolutions on the floor. The resolutions also had exactly half the amount of votes, one less for them to pass, and only one could pass. Realizing the difficulty of my situation as the ally of both resolutions, I was able to extract concessions from both sides in an attempt to get the best deal for Mongolia. When we entered the voting procedure on the resolutions, to determine which one would pass and which fail, I decided that, in the best interest of the Mongolian people, we would vote against both resolutions. Things got crazy in the immediate aftermath of my destruction of the committee. It was a hard decision to betray my allies. I did openly lie to both sides about my support, just to make sure they would not try to win votes from others. The end result was three days of negotiations and deal making only to be torpedoed by me because the coalitions did not meet my demands.
These experiences can only be offered in Model UN. The politicking and deal making will excite any thrill seeker, not to mention the social aspects as well. There was a delegate dance, with international music, an international bazaar, and a casino night. Model UN is more than just pretending to be a diplomat from some random far flung nation, it’s an eye opening experience and a great chance to meet people one would normally never have the chance to meet. Meeting Venezuelans who were protesting against their corrupt president, meeting Chinese students and learning about their educational system — these opportunities are only offered at Model UN.
Goucher’s Model UN club is also planning on attending a local conference at Gettysburg College soon and we are open having to new and adventurous delegates.

DAVID KAHANA

Club Chat: Fashion Club

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Goucher has a reputation for being a creative place, and for this installment of Club Chat, I talked to Elisabeth Wagner, ‘18, a co-president of Goucher’s fashion club.

Fashion Club hopes to “give students the opportunity to express themselves creatively through the means of fashion.” Photo Credit: Google Images

Q: What is your Club’s general purpose?
A: [The purpose] is to give students the opportunity to express themselves creatively through the means of fashion. Whether that’s sewing, embroidering, silk-screen printing we wanted to be able to give the ability and freedom to any student that came to us with a creative idea that they wanted to execute. We just got a bunch of silk-screen printing stuff, we have embroidery stuff, we have a few sewing machines…

Q: How does your club work structurally? Do you have meetings? A: Are you more event based?
We are trying to figure out a weekly meeting time, we don’t have a set meeting time yet.

Q: What gave you the idea to start the club?
A: I felt like they didn’t have anything fashion-oriented at Goucher. That’s something I’m interested in, and something I want to work professionally in. It was actually my friend who came up with the idea, and we got on top of it, and got funding for it.

Q: What are your plans this coming semester?
A: We have a few ideas! We just thought of something, where we want to give students the opportunity to donate old denim: pants, jackets, shorts… and let us rework it. We haven’t totally fleshed out whether it’s going to be free of cost, or if it will be a couple of dollars that will go into funding ourselves.

I wanted to do a fashion zine, since Goucher doesn’t have that and I think it’s a good way to explore personal expression and style on campus, which is obviously something that’s very prevalent and loud and I think that a lot of people at Goucher are very expressive. I think it would be nice to give them a platform recognizing it.

Q: Why should people participate in your club out of all the other options out there?
A: It’s a low stress environment to express yourself, and have the means to create different pieces. It’s about giving people the freedom of expression, and the means to do it.

And that’s that for this installment of club chat! Interested in having your organization featured in the next issue of the Q? Email me at firut001@mail.goucher.edu for your chance to be in the next edition!

A Sweet Treat

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The Scoop on an Ice Cream Stall in Baltimore Where Six Alumae/i and Students Happen to Work

Rae Walker, ‘17, and Hannah Speigelman, ‘15, at the Little Baby’s Ice Cream Stall. Photo Credit: Sophia Hancock

The bustling upscale “food hall” R. House is home to a surprising subset of the Goucher community. Tucked into a corner of the marketplace, Little Baby’s Ice Cream sells handmade, small batch ice cream with unique flavors, like Earl Gray Sriracha. The slim, brightly lit stall also happens to be the workplace of six former and current Goucher students.
Perhaps you’ve seen the ad. Sitting in front of a black backdrop, a person who appears to be made of a thick white substance stares outward, wide-eyed. He reaches up, scoops at the top of his head with a large spoon, brings the spoon to his mouth, and licks it. A faint lullaby plays as a slow voiceover begins his hypnotic monologue by saying, “there’s good reason for my glistening skin.” The camera zooms out. At the end of the clip, a cheerful logo for Little Baby’s Ice Cream appears—a smiling ice cream cone holding a spoon and an ice cream scooper. While perhaps it is not the most immediately appetizing, the popular youtube ad certainly gets your attention.
My knowledge of this ad campaign, however, did not lessen my surprise when Goucher alum Rae Walker (’17) informed me, somewhat offhandedly, that in addition to teaching full-time and getting a Master’s degree in education, he also scooped ice cream at a place called Little Baby’s.
Little Baby’s Ice Cream (LBIC) was founded in Philadelphia in 2011 and has expanded over the years to offer catering services in Southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Baltimore, and Washington, DC., with stalls located in D.C. and at Baltimore’s R. House. The founders believed that that ice cream could “bring people together.” Classic. It gets a little weirder, however, in the next part of their mission statement, which states that they see ice cream as “a unique opportunity to subvert people’s expectations,” a goal which they achieve in their ads, flavors, and business model.
“Little Baby’s is known for its weirdness,” said Hannah Spiegelman, ’15, the current manager of the Baltimore branch. Spiegelman worked in ice cream shops during the summers. At Goucher, she studied history, with a minor in art history. After graduating, she was determined to go down a path that involved museum work. However, after working in Special Collections at Goucher, she realized that it wasn’t the right path for right for her. In December 2016, when she saw on Instagram that the Little Baby’s Ice Cream (LBIC) stall at R. House was hiring, she applied. Within a year, she would become the manager herself.
“I realized that food is my greater passion,” said Spiegelman. “When I graduated…I thought that whatever I decided to do now [immediately after graduation] would be my life, but the more I talk to people, I see people who’ve completely changed what it is they’re doing. It’s okay not to know. People say ‘you’ve had four years to figure it out,’ when actually, no, I’ve had four years to become a completely different person and now I need to take time to process it.”

LBIC has kooky initiatives like a Pay It Forward Board through which you might pay for ice cream for a cancer survivor or a single dad, or for someone to do ten push-ups in the shop. Their biggest competitor in the area is The Charmery, probably due to the fact that, in addition to selling small-batch high-quality ice cream, both the Charmery and LBIC cater to eccentric tastes, with flavors like the Charmery’s Old Bay Seasoning and LBIC’s Pizza flavor.
When the photographer and I arrived at Little Baby’s for the interview with Spiegelman, Walker, who was manning the stall, handed us samples of every flavor that they had in stock. Earl Gray Sriracha was unexpectedly delicious and had a nice kick to it. After the interview, we walked away with scoops of Lychee Lemonade, which was very lemony and similar to sorbet, and Chocolate Mint Cookie, which was like eating Girl Scout Thin Mints in ice-cream form. Both were vegan flavors but certainly did not taste “vegan.”
LBIC’s unusual offerings attracted Spiegelman. “I hate boring ice cream flavors,” she said.

During Spiegelman’s time at LBIC, the number of Goucher-affiliated employs has steadily increased. Many of them work at LBIC in addition to having other positions and/or applying for or saving money for graduate school.
For example, Yael Ben Chaim, ‘16, started at LBIC in April 2017, while she had an AmeriCorps position working at the Maryland Farmers Market Association at a nearby location. She appreciated the combination of the office-based AmeriCorps job and the customer-service. Currently she works at MOMs Organic Market and she plans to go to graduate school for social work within the next two years. Yael’s favorite flavor is Plain. “It is simple, sweet and easy to enjoy,” she says. “It also mixes well with any other flavor on the menu!”
Rae works at LBIC at night and on the weekends. During the week, he is a Special Education teacher in a Baltimore public school, and is getting his master’s in education through Teach for America. Rae is also a fan of LBIC’s plain ice cream, but will willingly try any of the more unusual options.
Emily Abramson, ‘18, self-described avid tea drinker, started at LBIC in July 2017. She’s currently at Goucher in her final year for a Masters in Management. She also works part-time as a graduate assistant for the Office of Community-Based Learning (CBL) and is an intern for AARP Maryland’s state office, working to coordinate a statewide food drive in April. Other than all of that, she’s a freelance artist.
Emily’s favorite LBIC flavor would either be “Pumpkin Curry for the sweet/savory combo [and] the currants and cream because it reminds me of picking currants from my backyard when I was a little kid” or the “Cherry Hibiscus because the strong bitter flavor of the hibiscus counters the sweetness of the candied cherries perfectly.”
After she was hired at LBIC, Abramson encouraged Sophie Anger, ‘17, who was still a student and was looking for a weekend job, to apply. Anger started in September, while she was student teaching second grade at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School. Her favorite flavor is Coffee Toffee, because “I just love coffee ice cream, but I also loved our seasonal crushed candy cane, and chocolate ginger.”
Goucher student David Hernandez, ‘18, also works at LBIC. A history major, he is currently working on an archeological dig on campus, called the Epsom Project. His favorite flavors are a tie between Cherry Hibiscus because he’s “never tasted anything like it,” and Vegan Thai Iced Tea, which is made with delicious coconut cream.
This little ice cream stall has turned into a mini-Goucher community outside of Goucher. They work hard together and enthuse about their coworkers’ positivity, passion, and inspiring desires to make positive change in the world.

Rae Walker, ‘17 scoops ice cream at Little Baby’s Ice Cream when he’s not working as a Special Education teacher at Dr Carter G Woodson Elementary Middle School. Credit: Sophia Hancock

Spiegelman’s job as a manager, however, is not without its difficulties.
“R. House oozes that white men built it,” said Spiegelman. At the time that Spiegelman started at the newly-opened Baltimore branch, LBIC was partnered with Blk//Sugar, a bakery owned by Krystal Mack, who was the only woman and only black person working as a manager at R. House.
“I love the people that work here,” said Spiegelman. “It’s just the people upstairs…When I go to meetings with them, I’m the youngest, I’m the only woman…Everyone else is a white male.” Spiegelman laughed, drawing connections between her awareness of her management situation and her experiences at Goucher. “You don’t realize everything you’ve learned until you’re put into a situation, and then you’re like oh, that was very Goucher of me.”
A Goucher education can be taken in many directions. In addition to reflecting on how Goucher had opened her to a certain way of thinking, Spiegelman also emphasized how proud she was of all of her co-workers. “When you hear about alums, you just hear about alums in law firms, but the majority of graduated students are working in food service or something like that…[they are] working five jobs…and it’s all valid and awesome,” said Spiegelman. “There’s a lot of pressure to get salary jobs right out of school, and it would be great to have a salary job right now but there’s nothing wrong with working just because you love it. People should be celebrated for making it in this crazy world.”

In addition to managing Little Baby’s, Spiegelman works part-time in Goucher’s Special Collections. And on the side, she makes her own ice cream, based on historical art, events, and people, etc.! (Follow her on Instagram: @asweethistory). Her favorite LBIC flavor is Maryland BBQ because “it is unexpectedly delicious” and she hopes to go to graduate school for food studies in the fall.

A Little Extra
As part of the interviews, I asked alums to write what they appreciated about their co-workers. They all had many lovely things to say. Emily Abramson’s comments were so sweet and individualized, however, that it was impossible to resist publishing them all.

From Emily, on her co-workers:
Hannah: A sweet boss and always someone that is there for me. Both of us have this unique quality in which it can take one of us upwards of half an hour to tell a story, so there’s never a quiet moment when we’re working together.
Yael: An angel, and one of the sweetest people in the world. She brings out the goofy side in me, and we’ve heard reports from other R House staff that they can sometimes hear us laughing from across the building.
Efehi: I love Efehi for many many reasons, one of which being that she’s the only one that can keep up with me when I’m dancing in the stall.
Rae: Rae and I always manage to make each other laugh so hard we wheeze when we work together.
David: David’s smile always charms the older gay men into giving us lots of tips, which I appreciate. He’s so so sweet, and incredibly understanding.
Sophie: Through thick and thin, Sophie is a dear friend and a great person to work with. We spend slow days at work experimenting with weird flavor combinations and laughing at ridiculous college stories.
Zac: An impeccable fashion sense and such a down to earth dude.

Spiegelman also happily made it clear in her interview that Goucher students who visit Little Baby’s (while she is the manager, at least) will receive a discount.

Abby Stein: Trans Activist and Former Rebbe Visits Goucher

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On February 20th, Goucher Hillel brought activist Abby Stein to come speak with the college community.

Socialized as a man for the first twenty years of her life and born into a royal bloodline, Stein was trained as a rebbe for the Hasidic community shortly after her arranged marriage at age 19. She left the community in 2012, and came out as a transgender woman in 2015.
Photo Credit: Google Images

During her talk in the Hyman Forum, Stein told us about her life on the inside of the Hasidic community of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (For some reference, think of Fiddler on the Roof.) She informed us how she was taught that “T.V. is the devil,” and that men and women should occupy entirely separate spheres of the Hasidic community.
Socialized as a man for the first twenty years of her life and born into a royal bloodline, Stein was trained as a rebbe for the Hasidic community shortly after her arranged marriage at age 19. She left the community in 2012, and came out as a transgender woman in 2015. She spent a significant part of her talk describing the schooling system within the Hasidic community, pointing out that only girls were taught any English growing up. While boys were expected to study the Talmud, requiring them to only need to know Hebrew and Yiddish, most girls worked in the larger Brooklyn area once married. Despite this, the secludedness of the community ensured that the prevailing languages spoken were Hebrew and Yiddish. Stein underscored this point when she said that after leaving the community it was as if she was an “immigrant to [her] own country,” despite having been born and raised in New York.
One of Stein’s slogans is “refusing to shut up.” A part of this includes educating people on Hasidism without bashing individuals within the community. I learned that being a rebbe is different from being a rabbi in that Stein remarked that rebbes are considered the “political, spiritual, and financial leader” of the community. She likened the community’s structure to that of a monarchy, and commented that “[gender] roles are set in stone.” That she herself was a rebbe within this incredibly insular community made this ethnographic approach more accessible to me. Instead of feeling the need to defend any aspect of Judaism, I could simply appreciate Stein’s critique of the tradition she was raised in.
An engaging speaker, Stein felt approachable. She sidestepped the subject of how to be a good ally, and instead challenged us as audience members to listen to her story without needing to make it about us instead. She spent an hour telling us the story of her life, and an hour after that answering questions from the audience about almost anything under the sun. Stein made it clear that she does not have all the answers to how we can build a more welcoming world on a large scale, but she does know that the self-made choice to come out is worth celebrating.
So, what? Why should we care? What if you aren’t queer, or Jewish, or both? Callie Hamm, ‘21, summed it up simply: “anybody from any background can get something out of it.”
Here are a few of the resources Stein highlighted in her talk:

  • Her website, http://thesecondtransition.blogspot.com/ includes her blog and a plethora of Jewish- and queer-centric resources
  • Watching YouTube videos of trans people talking about their identities
  • One of Us on Netflix
  • Follow her on Instagram @abbychavastein

In addition to bringing speakers to campus from time to time, Goucher Hillel hosts a free Shabbat dinner every Friday night, and all are welcome to attend. Want to know more about Abby Stein, Jewish life on campus, or are interested in being a part of a Jewish and Queer affinity space? Feel free to email me at nelev001@mail.goucher.edu.

 

NEVE LEVENSON

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