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The Fight Against Mining in Ecuador: Educate Yourself!

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One of the waterfalls of Las Gemelas has been visibly discolored orange and brown since the summer of 2016. Photo Credit: Kate Longabaugh.

In July 2018, I traveled to Junín in the region of Intag, Ecuador to assist environmental studies professor Emily Billo in her research on resistance to resource extraction. As we walked through Junín’s Community Eco-Reserve to test the water for contamination, I could see the negative effects of the exploratory mining activities on the landscape. There was visible deforestation and erosion from mule trains carrying drilling equipment in and out of the reserve. My companions told me how they used to be able to hear many different kinds of birds; now I could only hear the loud hum of generators and drilling in the distance. Then there was the water which was visibly discolored orange or brown in some places.

Junín is well known for its highly biodiverse cloud forests. However, these could soon be destroyed by the creation of an open pit copper mine. Negative effects are already emerging in the water from mining exploration in the area, including increased conductivity, acidity, and toxic elements. The environment is also affected by deforestation, landslides, and loss of biodiversity. In addition to these effects, Junín and other communities that subsist on the land, raising cattle, practicing fair-trade coffee production, and eco-tourism would be displaced.

The small campesino community of Junín has been fighting mining for over 20 years.

In the 1990s, Japanese company Bishi Metals began exploration for copper. Community organizers, supported by the national environmental organization Acción Ecológica and the local environmental organization Defensa y Conservación Ecológica de Intag (DECOIN), mounted a resistance and ejected Bishi Metals. However, in the mid-2000s, Canadian company Ascendent Copper arrived. Confronted with community resistance that even challenged Ascendant’s hired paramilitary squad, the company left the region by the end of 2008. The documentary Under Rich Earth (2008) covers this incident and is available on YouTube.

The situation in Intag worsened after the 2008 election of president Rafael Correa, who promoted ‘post-neoliberal’ policies. Correa criticized exploitation by multinational corporations and introduced a new model of extraction led by the Ecuadorian state. Yet state control over extraction has not been better for all Ecuadorians as the state has criminalized anyone who protests extraction. The government also closed some environmental organizations and made it hard for organizations to get international funding.

Under Correa, the state-owned mining company of ENAMI partnered with CODLECO of Chile to explore minerals in Intag. In 2014, they forced entry with national police into Junín and their Community Ecological Reserve. While the community has rights to the surface of the land, the state has rights to the subsurface minerals. ENAMI kept a police presence in the area and even jailed the former president of Junín, Javier Ramírez, for 10 months under dubious charges. This presence led to a breakdown of community and people kept more to themselves. Divisions among families and friends had already existed for a while but worsened during this period of surveillance.

During our time in Junín, Professor Billo and I found that there were some changes in the social environment. ENAMI and CODELCO have solidified their presence over the past four years, employing local residents directly and indirectly. Other locals held to their values and made their living through more sustainable options of eco-tourism and fair-trade coffee. Miners and anti-miners were interacting again after previously ignoring each other, but the controversial topic of mining was off limits. However, life had already been permanently impacted by the past police presence and anti-mining residents in Junín still keep to themselves and their houses as Junín has become a company town for ENAMI.

In talking to community organizers, we found that the fight continues and protest still exists, but it’s not as strong or organized as it used to be. As one organizer shared, rather than being a step ahead of the company like before, they are a step behind. They don’t have the same financial resources as before and instead pay out of pocket to go to meetings and protests. Many community organizers are women, presenting a double or triple burden for them as they balance employment, household chores, and caring for children together with resistance efforts.

Yet there is still hope. Two other major mining projects in southern Ecuador have been temporarily halted for concerns related to water contamination and other environmental and social impacts. Although the current president of Ecuador, Lenín Moreno, is from the same political party as Correa, Moreno has not taken a strong stance on state mining and these recent halts suggest a possibility to slow or stop extractivism. In December, ENAMI’s Environmental Impact Statement will expire, concluding a 4-year exploration phase, but the company has petitioned the government to extend this phase. If not granted, the company would enter a 4-year analysis phase which would mean the company would employ fewer local residents. Additionally, in February there will be local elections, and organizers hope to see the success of some anti-mining candidates giving the resistance a stronger voice in the government.

Community organizers asked us to spread the word of their situation and fight so that more people know what is happening in Intag. Please share what you have just learned with others! If you’re looking for more information or ways to help, DECOIN continues to engage in anti-mining resistance efforts with residents of the region.

There will be an ICA to Ecuador in Summer 2019, which will spend a few days in Junín and the cloud forest region of Intag to learn more about organized resistance to mining and the sustainable alternatives some community members pursue. If you’re interested in learning more, the Info Session for Ecuador ICA is on Friday, October 19th, 3-4 p.m. in JR 251.

BY KATE LONGABAUGH

The Baltimore Intercollegiate Alliance: What Is It, Who Is It, and Why Should I Care?

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Picture source: Ad posted by Maddie Wolf on the Baltimore Intercollegiate Alliance Facebook page

The Baltimore Intercollegiate Alliance (BIA) is an organizing group created and run by Baltimore-area students at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Maddie Wolf, a senior at MICA, said that “the BIA is a coalition network of students who are engaged in activism, advocacy, and organizing . . . What we are trying to do is to use our collective power and connection to leverage our institutional power to create positive change in Baltimore and on our campuses.” The organization was started by a group of students after the 2016 presidential election. After a formative period of self-organizing and establishing relationships around the city, the BIA has grown from a core base of members to actively creating events that give space for intercollegiate relationships to form.

An example of this relationship-building manifested itself in the collaborative process of creating and running the group’s first event, hosted on September 23rd at the 2640 Space. A number of Goucher students are already involved with the BIA. Three of these students (James Williams, ‘19, Zoe Brown, ‘19, and Noah Block, ‘21) all worked with students from other colleges in the Baltimore area when planning this first event. Block remarked that the collaborative process of planning this event “gets to the goals and values of BIA, which is to promote collaboration and [our] approach to the values of justice and equity that we’re fighting for and we can’t do that in silos. [BIA] provides a leadership path for people from different campuses to engage with each other collaboratively and meaningfully across campus boundaries and communities.”

The BIA defines its mission and values in an organizational manifesto. According to that document,  the members of the group believe in promoting “direct action,” “building and sustaining relationships with community organizations,” and “challenging political influence on social institutions.” At this first event, Steph Saxton, a graduate student from Johns Hopkins University, spoke directly to all of these tenets while talking about the organization Students Against Private Police. This organization was started in March 2018 in response to Johns Hopkins University’s administration creating a bill to begin making a police force that Saxton described as “separate from BPD, to patrol the campuses and the surrounding neighborhoods.” This action did not involve input from students, faculty, or members of the local community. The organization protested, testified in Annapolis, and the bill was pulled because of “student efforts.” “We do have student power,” Saxton said and stressed that the group had support from other organizations, including the BIA. “All of us are in this room right now because we believe, in some way, that student voices can speak to these institutions against their natural inclination towards capital accumulation,” Saxton said, “we believe that we can stop these institutions from their extractive practices on poor and Black Baltimore, and that’s what we want to do.”

The BIA’s manifesto also states that the organization “[strives] to mobilize the Baltimore college student body.” Sonia Borenstein, a student at UMBC, spoke directly to this point during her presentation on mobilization, which she defined as “people coming together, usually in grassroots causes, working towards a common goal with a drive for getting it done with specific goals and plans in mind.” Borenstein emphasized the importance of mobilization, stating that “it has always been the mass mobilization of people that has truly gotten change to society.” Mobilization, she said, involves “showing up, showing you’re there, sending your voice, your aid, your time, your labor, your dedication all to the goals you’ve collectively set up.”

The event concluded with students gathering together to begin brainstorming different goals for the academic year. These goals included holding those in power on campus accountable, focusing on mental health, opening up conversation about sexual assault, and “active LGBTQIA inclusion on campuses.”

One of the most critical elements of how the BIA functions is that it runs off of student power. As a student on a campus in the greater Baltimore area, each of us has the ability to add our own insights on current political issues. Those insights and connections to our own identities help generate momentum around current social movements. The only way to make that happen is to show up. To connect with the BIA,  join their contact list at bit.ly/JOINBIA.

BY SKYLER AIKERSON AND NEVE LEVINSON

2018 Baltimore NEDA Walk: Hope, Strength, Recovery

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Photo Credit: NEDA Walk shirt obtained by Anonymous

The National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) is a “nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting individuals and families affected by eating disorders.” NEDA’s vision is a world without eating disorders, and their mission is to support and serve as a “catalyst for prevention, cures, and access to quality care.”

Every year, all throughout the country, NEDA hosts walks to raise money and awareness about eating disorders. NEDA walks are a great way for people with connections to eating disorders to seek support from a community of people who understand what it’s like, support those who need it, hear empowering messages from speakers, and be a part of something bigger.  

On Sunday, September 30th, Goucher hosted the NEDA walk at the Dorsey Center. After getting a chance to check in, participants had time to meet other people at the event and talk to representatives of NEDA programs before a voice came through the speakers and announced Kara Richardson Whitely as the first speaker of the morning.

Kara is a motivational public speaker, an author, a mother, and she is in recovery from an eating disorder. In her speech, she shared how, as a part of her recovery, she’s climbed to extraordinary heights, both figuratively and literally, by climbing Mount Kilimanjaro three times.

The second speaker of the day was Andrew Walen. Andrew is an author, speaker, advocate, and certified eating disorder specialist with expertise in males with eating disorders. He joked about how he didn’t know what to say until five minutes before getting in front of everyone, but in his speech, he talked about his battle with an eating disorder, how he overcame it with the help of his wife and son, and he talked about all the amazing things he’s seen people do in recovery, which I saw as very impactful for men with eating disorders because, while eating disorders aren’t as common in men, around one-third of those with eating disorders are male.

After the speeches, the walk began. We gathered behind the NEDA banner and started to walk from the Dorsey Center, around the Loop Road, between Stimson and Heubeck, down Van Meter, and back to Dorsey. In the concluding announcements, three individuals and one team were identified and recognized for their fundraising contributions. After that, people started to dwindle away, and the walk ended.

One year ago, I sat in my P. Selz dorm on Goucher’s campus struggling with my own mental health. But this wasn’t something new to me. I have struggled with mental illness for my entire life. I won’t get into numbers, but I have been in a multi-year long battle with an eating disorder. A year ago, I wasn’t a person; I was the embodiment of my eating disorder pretending to be me.

Before I came to Goucher, I had an entire team of medical professionals telling me to not go to school and to go back into treatment instead, but I refused. I knew what I was getting myself into, but that’s the thing about being sick with an eating disorder: it can make you feel in control and like nothing can hurt you – until something does and you have to leave everything you love behind.

My eating disorder caused an avalanche of events that ruined my life, sending me to the ground in shambles. I didn’t know where to start picking up the pieces to attempt to tape them back into place, so I eventually got up and I went to treatment. And I pretended to be okay until I made it back to school. Then I crashed again, this time harder and faster and in a more devastating way than before. Only this time I didn’t get up. I didn’t even pretend. I was done fighting.

I was done until I, the real non-eating disorder me, asked myself to try one more time. I got myself into to treatment and instantly regretted it. I hated every minute of being there at first, but slowly my mind started to shift. Was this recovery? I wasn’t going to question it because it was forward momentum, real progress! I am standing here proud to say that while yes, my recovery is very little after time and time again of trying and failing, it’s enormous to me and my supporters.

The 2018 Baltimore NEDA Walk was my first walk where I was fully in recovery. It was both inspiring and empowering for me and my recovery. And I hope it is the same for others who are recovered, in recovery, finding recovery, and those who are supporters.

I know it’s hard to find hope and healing, but it is possible. If you’re struggling, reach out for support. Recovery IS possible. You are worth it and you are enough.

BY ANONYMOUS

Public Safety Blotter

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The Quindecim is granted access to information about violations of the Goucher College Code of Conduct and Academic Honor code. The information below was obtained from The Office of Public Safety and is publicly available. This weeks blotter consists of incidents that occurred between September 5th, 2018 and September 19th, 2018.

PUBLIC SAFETY INCIDENT REPORTS

9/05/18 – 9/19/18

Alcohol/Drug

  • Student drug violation in Stimson
  • Student drug violation in Mary Fisher
  • Student drug violation in Froelicher
  • Student drug violation in Mary Fisher
  • Student drug violation in Trustee’s Hall

Fire Safety

  • Accidental fire alarm in Heubeck
  • Fire alarm malfunction in Mary Fisher
  • Fire alarm malfunction in the SRC

Injury /Medical Emergency

  • Ill/injured person in Van Meter (Ex-cleared)
  • Medical emergency on campus grounds
  • Medical emergency in P-Selz
  • Medical emergency in P-Selz
  • Medical emergency in Trustees
  • Medical emergency in Heubeck
  • Medical emergency in Athenaeum
  • Medical emergency in Heubeck

Vehicle Incident

  • Motor vehicle accident, Mary Fisher
  • Motor vehicle accident in the SRC parking lot

Damage/Vandalism

  • Vandalism in Trustees Hall
  • Vandalism in the Athenaeum

Goucher Phases Out Majors, Student Reaction Leads to Town Hall Meeting

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Credit: Flyer emailed out by OSE

This summer, Goucher announced that it would be phasing out programs that were not popular among the students, reducing the amount of academic majors from 33 to 25. The process came from a decision by Goucher College’s Board of Trustees, which warned that without a cut to costs, Goucher would face financial trouble. Goucher stresses, however, that the college has maintained its “A-“ credit rating after a “very thorough review” by the Standard and Poors this past summer.

The review process involved a team of 13 faculty members, called the Internal Review Team (IRT), who reviewed student data to come to a conclusion. Some of the data was sourced from “course evaluations” submitted in the past three years, which was then analyzed by the IRT and approved by external reviewers. The result was the discontinuation of eight courses as majors. Classes within these disciplines will still be offered.

Responses to the initiative, called “academic revitalization,” range from unsurprised to outraged. In response, a town hall meeting was assembled between President Bowen, the Board of Trustees, a few faculty members, and students. During the student input section of the meeting, senior Langston Cotman voiced his frustration.

“I think looking at data is different from student input…I have heard ‘majors you want,’ I have heard ‘voting with your feet,’ and now I’m hearing in this next process you want to actually hear our voices. I would have loved if you’d started with that.”

Acting President of Goucher Senate Samuel Anderson agrees that Goucher’s primary mistake was one of communication.

“I think that the academic revitalization process was certainly flawed in many stages of communication. This represents an underlying problem that exists here at Goucher and that students are organizing and advocating change.”

Goucher’s decision to phase out certain programs is not unique. According to the Baltimore Sun, seven Texas universities eliminated their physics programs, while the University of the District of Columbia cut 17 of their own programs, including physics, in recent years.

At the town hall meeting, theater professor Michael Curry spoke about his role in the Internal Review Team.

“Nobody on the faculty chose to do this work, we all knew what it meant, but we also knew that it was extremely important for this to happen for the college to survive.”

The immediate threat to Goucher’s survival was left unclear. All that was said in the meeting was that the Board of Trustees felt it necessary to prioritize programs to avoid raising the cost of tuition beyond inflation adjustments. The students, however, still demand that the process be more transparent.

“We need more in-the-moment relational transparency from the administration about decisions being made, as well as their vision for Goucher,” said a pamphlet handed out by student activist Zoe Gilmore. “We need a mechanism for continued transparency.”

JOSHUA GREENBERG

The Quindecim Fall 2018- Spring 2019 Ad Rate Card

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The Quindecim

The Independent Student Newspaper of Goucher College

______________________________________________

Advertising Rate Card

2018-2019 Academic Year

The Quindecim
Goucher College
1021 Dulaney Valley Road
Baltimore, Maryland 21204
Email: quin@mail.goucher.edu

Hello:

It is with great pleasure that we, The Quindecim, Goucher College’s student-run newspaper, submit our rate card for the 2018-2019 academic year. Our newspaper serves over 2000 students, alumni, faculty, staff, and parents at Goucher College and in the greater Baltimore community. Located in the heart of Towson, Maryland and only minutes from businesses in downtown Baltimore and around the beltway, Goucher College is a diverse community whose members are important and loyal patrons to your business.

Below is our list of advertising prices, our policies, our publication schedule, and our contact information. Please let us know how we can assist you.

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    (on website and social media)

Goucher College, its employees, organizations, and students receive a 10% discount.
All ads (except classifieds) must be press-ready. Ads that require typesetting, reduction, enlargement, alteration, or additional artwork will be charged an additional 5-10%.

Please contact us for a Fall 2018 publication schedule.

Placement information:

Space must be reserved and copy received by 5:00 pm on the day of deadline unless other arrangements are made with the Editors-in-Chief. Please do not attempt to deliver artwork directly to our office without calling ahead to make arrangements.

Sending artwork and advertising information electronically is preferred. Please send artwork as a JPG, TIF, GIF, BMP, or PDF file. JPG is our most preferred format.

Space and placement is on a first-come, first-serve basis, unless The Quindecim is otherwise contractually obligated.

Placement and inclusion of advertisements is at the discretion of The Quindecim Editorial Board, who reserve the right to change page placement, alter ad sizes to meet our column in requirements, and to cancel reserved ads. You will be contacted in the extremely rare event that a change needs to be made. If a refund is warranted, we will promptly provide one.

Proof of publication and/or billing information will be sent within 8 days of publication, if requested. If payments are not made within 30 days, an additional $35 late fee will be charged for every 60 days overdue, up to $140.

If you have any questions about advertising in The Quindecim or would like to reserve space, we will be glad to assist you.

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It’s More than the Title – Crazy Rich Asians

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For the first time in a quarter of a century, Hollywood has made a rom-com movie with an all Asian cast entitled Crazy Rich Asians. Starring Constance Wu, Harry Shum Jr, Awkwafina, Ken Jeong, Remmy Tan, Michelle Yeoh, Henry Golding and so many more, the lineup is breaking grounds. This book turned movie is hitting the big screen on August 17, 2018 and is one of the few blockbuster films starring Asians in lead roles (but the only one with a full Asian cast) this summer. Backed by Warner Brothers and directed by Jon M. Chu, known for Justin Bieber: Never Say Never, Step Up and Now You See Me 2, the trailer for the highly anticipated movie dropped on April 23 on The Ellen Show.

Now, for some, the plot may seem a bit too generic. Rich man falls in love with a poor woman, decides to introduce her to his family, his mother doesn’t think the woman is good enough, and hilarity/drama ensues. But for the Asian American community, this is a huge deal. For, in Hollywood, Asian American representation is not very common since the practice of whitewashing of roles in major films is very frequent. With the most publicized of these being Emma Stone in Aloha, Tilda Swinton in Doctor Strange, Scarlett Johansson in Ghost in a Shell, basically the whole cast of The Last Airbender, and Matt Smith in The Great Wall. Even Crazy Rich Asians and the soon to be made, live-action Mulan, almost became the victim of whitewashing too. And so, while YouTube creators like Wong Fu Productions, Anna Akana, and Domics produce lots of stories about the Asian American/mundane experiences of life, and television shows like Fresh Off the Boat, My Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, Dr. Kim and Master of None fill in some of the gaps with regards to representation for Asian Americans, the impact is not the same.

However, with all the fanfare around this film, it should be noted that the movie does not represent every Asian American experience. I mean, how could it? It’s an hour to two-hour long film! But if anyone wants to hear more about this topic, the YouTube channel FUNG BROS did a video called CRAZY RICH ASIANS – WHY YOU SHOULD NOT WATCH IT AND WHY YOU SHOULD.

This conversation about what the movie means is only a small part of a much larger discussion. No matter how one spins it, Crazy Rich Asians is a step forward towards representation in the media for Asians and Asian Americans.

Photo Credit: Google Images

Goucher Assesses Academic Programs

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Goucher is currently undergoing a Program Prioritization Process. This process takes stock of programs that are currently in place and determines which programs are “healthy,” and “along the way we should discover what is working and not working within the programs,” according to Dr. Micah Webster, the faculty chair and Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science.

The goal of program prioritization is to develop an understanding of the institution and its programs in order to direct Goucher’s resources towards programs that support the institution’s goals. To clarify, “program” refers to a course of study requiring the completion of a specified number of semester credit hours from among a prescribed group of courses that leads to a formal award, ie. majors and minors (Source: MHEC).

The data collection process for the prioritization process began last semester and should be completed by mid-June, according to Dr. Webster. This process is being conducted by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness, the Office of Admissions, the Office of the Provost, and the programs themselves.

A committee of faculty that includes the Curriculum and Budget & Planning Committees, as well as tenured and non-tenured faculty, and representatives from all major faculty committees, work with the Provost to make recommendations to the Board of Trustees. According to Professor Ann Duncan, the Chair of the Academic Policies Committee, though the process is intended to be faculty led, because the Board of Trustees set the process in motion, it will be they who decide if the faculty plan sufficiently addresses the college’s needs.

The “Why”
Program prioritization programs tend to begin for financial reasons. According to Robert C. Dickeson, who wrote an influential book entitled Prioritizing Academic Programs and Services: Reallocating Resources to Achieve Strategic Balance, the most commonly cited reason for program prioritization is financial stress. Other reasons may include prioritization being a recurring process or part of strategic planning overall, the unacceptability of making equivalent cuts in all programs, and the governing board wanting the college to prioritize. According to Professor Duncan, while the process is intended to be conducted independently of dollar amounts, “the Board of Trustees hopes this process will save money by right sizing the faculty to fit our student body.”

When interviewed, President Jose Bowen emphasized that the process is “routine.” Goucher’s last program prioritization ended in 2014, before the start of President Bowen’s tenure at Goucher, during which the process recommended the elimination of Chinese and additions to the Psychology Department.

President Bowen cited a couple reasons for Goucher’s current program prioritization: the college is scheduled for re-accreditation, and hopes to expand in the future. In order to expand and to create new programs, the college must withdraw resources from existing programs. “You can’t keep adding. At some point, you either add, or you move things around,” said President Bowen.

By keeping tuition costs the same for one year and choosing to increase tuition by only 1.9% in 2018-19, President Bowen has committed to making Goucher more affordable. However, this means a decrease in net tuition revenue for the college, while inflation continues to increase. It also means that existing programs cannot be added to if costs are to remain the same. If student class sizes shrink, faculty must be reduced.

One possible solution to rising costs is increasing costs is changing the faculty-to-student ratio. “Costs are getting so prohibitive that there has been more openness to different size classes and different pedagogy,” said education consulting firm leader Kent John Chabotar, as cited in an article entitled “Tuition Conundrum,” published on InsideHigherEd.com. Of course, this also means reducing the numbers of faculty.

According to President Bowen, Goucher’s student-faculty ratio hasn’t changed, and the future size of the faculty will depend in part on the size of incoming classes. “If we grow [the student body] a little bit, we’ll add faculty,” said President Bowen. “If we shrink a little bit, then we’ll reduce faculty.” According to the President, the goal for Goucher in future years is to “grow slowly.”
It seems unlikely, however, that class sizes will grow. Colleges are facing financial trouble across the country, particularly small liberal arts colleges. President Bowen discussed the fact that there are fewer college students across the country than there were ten years ago, so colleges are competing for a smaller pool of students. “Right now, there are a million fewer people in college than there were in 2010,” said Bowen. “So there are fewer people going to college [and in that smaller pool] there are more people going to state institutions.”

Despite this, Goucher plans to remain a liberal arts institution. When asked what his vision was for Goucher five years down the road, Bowen said, “The truth is, that if I am really successful, if Goucher is really successful, we will remain a liberal arts college. That may sound less ambitious, but we may be the last liberal arts college. Because if you read the paper, they’re closing, they’re merging, they’re adding other kinds of things, they’re adding [vocational] programs…We want to be a liberal arts college. So what matters is how we do that. What kind of instruction do we offer? How do we keep classes nice and small?”

The “How”
The “how” is where program prioritization comes in. However, while the process is intended to ultimately benefit the college, this does not come without difficulties. The process may result in recommendations to eliminate positions or cut back current programs. Because of the instability and insecurity that this creates, faculty and staff may be concerned about the future of their programs and positions throughout this process. “Those things are painful, but they are part of the normal process,” said President Bowen.

Because the program prioritization process is faculty-run, it also involves additional work for professors. Faculty must come to an agreement about how to best measure the effectiveness of programs and then collect all the relevant data. According to Professor Ann Duncan, one challenge has been that, when this process was announced, the faculty were already hard at work on implementing the new curriculum. Much of the work on the new curriculum has been stalled until staffing numbers and program status are clear.

According to Duncan, “faculty are incredibly excited about the new curriculum and the creativity and interdisciplinarity it allows.” However, it will be a while before it is put in place across the board. For the next two years, faculty must run two different curriculums at the same time, as some students remain with the Liberal Education Requirements, while others are fullfing the new general education requirements, called Goucher Commons Requirements.
Once the program prioritization process is complete, faculty may also need to determine how to implement the new curriculum with fewer faculty. “We passed this curriculum with a certain sized faculty and with even the promise that we might be able to grow a little,” said Professor Duncan. “The reality now is that there are a lot of positions that have not been filled and we may be losing some positions.”

On a national level, one of the largest issues facing program prioritization programs is a lack of faculty buy-in. Despite this, members of Goucher’s faculty do understand the need for a response to the current challenges in higher education, and express concern for Goucher’s future. “The faculty recognize that times are tight financially, not just for Goucher but for colleges across the country,” said Professor Duncan. “At the same time, we want to ensure that any process we participate in maintains the integrity of the Goucher education.” At this stage, the effects of the process remain to be seen.

The Curriculum and Budget & Planning Committees have formed the criteria for the evaluation of programs, which are: relevance, efficiency, opportunity analysis, evidence of impact. These categories include factors like relevance, alignment with college mission, internal and external demand for program, teaching effectiveness in programs, contributions to and in support of the programs, numbers of students in the program, evidence of engagement with students, operational efficiency of the program, etc.

Goucher faculty have also asked administration to consider a voluntary separation program, which would provide financial benefits for faculty who decide to voluntarily leave the college. This program would benefit the college by generating compensation savings that can be spent in other ways, while the faculty member would benefit from both the financial benefits and the voluntary nature of the program.

Correction: Edits for clarity have been made to the fourth paragraph.

MADELINE ST. JOHN and GREER TURNER

Featured Image Credit: Projects · Ziger/Snead Architects

Goucher Says Farewell to Professors

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Throughout the course of a college’s life, professors come and go, leaving behind legacies that carry their names forward. Sadly, it is time to say goodbye to several committed faculty members of Goucher College. In 1983, when Goucher was still an all-women’s college and the Quindecim was called “The Weekly” (a strange name for a paper that was published once every two weeks), Barbara Roswell had just been hired as a writing professor. She will retire this year. Why? When asked, she chuckled, saying “I think a change once every thirty-five years is okay.”

Dr. Roswell and coworker, Mary Jo Wiese, are well known for their work n the Goucher Prison Education Partnership, a program which strives to give a college education to incarcerated members of society. “My two brothers are both judges in Ohio; my father also served as a judge. I grew up believing in the integrity of the judicial system” says Wiese, who is also leaving this year, “but, over time, I became painfully aware that we have a penal system, and not a correctional system.” Starting with a special edition of Reflections, a journal that was edited by Dr. Roswell, these professors saw the learning potential in those incarcerated in prison. Over the years, the program has changed the lives of potential students residing in the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup, Maryland. Professor Wiese’s husband is also retiring from his job this year, and they plan to travel together.

Professor Jeanne-Rachel Leroux will also be leaving this year, having accepted a teaching position in Staten Island, New York. Before coming to Goucher, Professor Leroux taught at several public high schools in Japan, as well as one international school. She came to Goucher five years ago, and has lived with her students in the Language House ever since.“I liked the Language House aspect of the contract. It allows me to interact with students outside of the classroom.” As the live-in professor for Language House, Professor Leroux oversaw many of the language-oriented events held there. Whether it be cooking events, language meetings, or just the community environment, Jeanne-Rachel Leroux was heavily involved in the community and will be remembered for bringing students together.

Her track is not unique for aspiring professors. Professor Leroux was at Goucher on a contractual basis, which would be renewed after several years if all went well. However, it is now time for her to settle into a more permanent position. “I have a lecturer position at CSI next year… It’s a relief to have a long-term contract because I have not had that. Almost ever,” Professor Leroux said. Obtaining a long term contract with a university can be difficult. Professors must build up experience before being asked to hold a long-term position, and must be able to go where the offers take them.

Associate Professor of Philosophy Margaret Grebowicz will be leaving Goucher as well, and will be remembered for her diverse legacy. From her books (Whale Song, The National Park to Come) to her effort to translate Polish poems into English, she has been a very accomplished and well-liked professor. “She was really engaging and caring for her students and added a special dimension to the philosophy department” says Dustin Taylor, a senior philosophy major.

We must also say goodbye to Professor Bernadette Tutinas, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Professor Tutinas is the longest standing professor to leave Goucher this year, and has taught everything from MA100 to MA333. Known for her specialty in Graph Theory and Combinatorics, she engaged students in all different disciplines, spreading math along the way “Mathematics is important and useful, but it is also beautiful in its patterns and rhythms. One of the greatest pleasures of teaching is helping students to see this beauty,” says Professor Tutinas. Goucher has changed tremendously since her tenure began, as it was not yet co-ed in 1981. Though the school has and will continue to change, her contributions to the college will surely not be forgotten.

Finally, Dr. George Delahunty will be leaving as well. He is the Lilian Welsh Professor of Biology at Goucher College. With a specialization in Physiology/Endocrinology, Dr. Delahunty was responsible for numerous biology courses at Goucher College, from Intro to Biology II to Endocrinology. Dr. Delahunty engaged a wide range of students with his expertise and anecdotal information. “He’s really well versed in all the material he teaches and always has extra fun facts or examples to share with us”, says senior Spanish major Maggie Ratrie. He will be remembered for his impressive knowledge of the field and ability to engage students from any major.

While it’s saddening to say goodbye to the professors we love, it’s important that we remember them fondly. The legacies of educators are measured by their impacts on students, and everyone remembers an educational experience that changed their lives. Although these professors will no longer be changing lives at Goucher, teachers are always out to educate, no matter where they are. Or, as retiring professor Barbara Roswell puts it, “Often the most exciting things we can do together are just having a group of people sitting around in a circle, talking about a text.”

JOSHUA GREENBERG (Contributor from the Goucher Eye)

Featured Image: patch.com

Mental Health Resources

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In order to clear up any confusion that may have been caused by an article published in the previous issue of the Q, the counseling center has a number of resources and systems in place that ensure that no student ever has to wait to speak with a mental health professional.

Student experiences with counseling center services are generally very positive—when surveyed, positive student feedback was higher than the national average, with 37% of students reporting counseling services as “very helpful” (as compared with the national average of 31%). The counseling center has also been able to meet the needs of 86% of students who have come to the counseling center, with 14% having been referred off campus.

The administration is also currently working to improve mental health and mental health treatment on campus, through efforts like partnering with the JED Foundation, constructing new counseling center facilities, conducting an environmental survey, and hiring a wellness coordinator.

Jean Perez, the Director of Sports Medicine, was recently named Director of Student Wellness. Her role, in her words, is to “coordinate a more holistic approach to well-being on campus, provide resources for students that address all dimensions of wellness, and to collaborate with other areas to integrate what all of the different offices are already doing to contribute to overall student well-being.” Part of this process will be to hire a campus recreation coordinator, who will “coordinate our club and intramural sports, create a campus recreation program and grow our outdoor adventure programming.”

There is also an abundance of people, offices, and resources available on campus that may be useful for students’ mental health—but sometimes it can seem like a bit of a scavenger hunt trying to find the right people or resources. The Q has compiled a list of these resources in efforts to make this process a little bit easier.

Name Contact Person Role Location

Counseling Resources

Counseling Center Counseling sessions are free and confidential. The center offers brief, individual counseling (typically less than 12 sessions), although there is no hard limit on the number of sessions students can have. The center typically schedules in-person intakes within 1-3 days. Even if there is a waitlist, students will still be able to complete an intake and no student with imminent safety concerns will be placed on a waitlist. Clinicians are trained in various empirically-supported treatment modalities appropriate to address a broad range of student experiences, symptoms, and diagnoses.  For students in need of specialized or long-term therapy options, community providers may be recommended. For more information: https://www.goucher.edu/experience/staying-healthy/counseling-services/ First floor of Huebeck (moving to Mary Fisher)
Urgent Walk-in Hours at the Counseling Center Monday – Friday at 1pm. Walk in to the counseling center if you are experiencing a mental health emergency.
After Hours Mental Health Hotline To speak with a mental health counselor after hours, call 855-236-4278. This service provides phone support by licensed clinicians. This is not just a crisis hotline—the clinicians can provide support for something more benign all the way up to suicidal ideation. As opposed to a national hotline, this service is provided in partnership with Goucher’s Counseling Center.   Clinicians are aware of resources both on and off campus.
Baltimore County Crisis Hotline 410-931-2214 A 24-hour hotline staffed by mental health professionals. The hotline is also connected with a Mobile Response Team of mental health clinicians and police officers that offer emergency responses to persons in need of urgent intervention.
Hospitalization Goucher has a memo of understanding with St. Joseph’s Medical Center to encourage ease of communication. If a student opts for hospitalization, they will be transported to the hospital in an ambulance, for safety reasons and in order to receive more immediate treatment. Clinicians work with students to explain the process.
Medical Withdrawal Andrew Wu manages the medical leave policy and consults with the counseling center concerning students returning from medical leave. For more information: https://www.goucher.edu/registrar/leave-of-absence-withdrawal-from-the-college/medical-compassionate-withdrawal-procedures
Psychiatry Services and the Health Center 410-337-6050 Students have access to psychiatry six hours a week through health services. First Floor of Huebeck

Committees

JED Committee Cameron Cox

Monica Neel

Andrew Wu

A committee formed through Goucher’s partnership with the JED foundation. Chaired by Cameron Cox, and led by Andrew Wu and Monica Neel, the group discusses what the college could be doing better in terms of mental health.
GSG Student Life Committee Noah Block

noah.block@mail.goucher.edu

Goucher Student Government committee working around wellness, mental health, and other aspects of student life on campus. Meets in Office of Student Engagement

People and Offices

Jean Perez (New Wellness Coordinator) jean.perez@goucher.edu “My role is to coordinate a more holistic approach to well-being on campus, provide resources for students that address all dimensions of wellness, and to collaborate with other areas to integrate what all of the different offices are already doing to contribute to overall student well-being.

Part of that is the hiring of a campus recreation coordinator, who will coordinate our club and intramural sports, create a campus recreation program and grow our outdoor adventure programming.  Her office will be located in one of the new residence halls (building 1C), in the Wellness Resource Center. We will also be opening an equipment issue room in the Sports and Recreation Center where students can rent out various sports equipment.”

Peer Listeners 443-632-7799 Peer listeners are available from 7pm-2am every night. Peer listening occurs in person. Every semester, there is a week long peer listening training, during which Peer Listeners do role playing and focus on listening skills and some content areas, such as stress, anxiety, sexual assault, and depression. They are trained in basic resources on campus so that they can provide references. They don’t offer personal advice. Peer listeners are a very confidential resource because they don’t report out–they report up, to Cynthia Terry. The program, developed by Roshelle Kades, has been in existence for over 7 years.
Office of Religious and Spiritual Life Chaplain Cynthia Terry

cynthia.terry@goucher.edu

and Rabbi Josh Snyder

josh.snyder@goucher.edu

Cynthia Terry: “As chaplain of this community, I am eager to work with all members of the Goucher College community—students, faculty, and staff—as they explore their spiritual values and commitments, express their religious traditions, search for meaning and value, and seek answers to their questions. I also understand that, as chaplain, I can be a companion in life’s journey, through the painful places of illness, depression, addiction, grief, and abuse, as well as through joyful celebrations of achievement, accomplishment, and important relationships.  I am a confidential resource.”

Rabbi Josh: “As a Rabbi, I’m available to students for pastoral counseling as they desire.  That doesn’t mean religion has to be a part of it, though questions of spirituality and meaning arise.  I’m available to any student regardless of religious background, and I can be emailed to set up a time. Mostly I am an active listener, a first step, and can help recommend other resources for students to seek out.”

Chapel (Chaplain); Interfaith Center (Rabbi)
Office of Student Development and Outreach Cameron Cox

Cameron.Cox@goucher.edu

and Alexandra Graves

alexandra.graves@goucher.edu

In the Office of Student Development and Outreach, Cameron and Alexandra support students through prevention, intervention, and support efforts for students across campus.  Both members of the office serve as case managers, supporting students facing hardships, those experiencing crises, and those struggling with other common barriers to success. We work differently with each student, so students have a personalized guide to help them develop and execute a support plan to get back on track.  Cameron and Alexandra assist students through various challenges such as: academic concerns, social/emotional distress, and other personal conflicts. In addition, Cameron serves as chair for the JED committee, a mental healthcare program on Goucher’s Campus, runs the Brother to Brother Affinity program, and serves as a member of the Residence Life staff.  Alexandra helps in leadership efforts for the department, works with students returning to campus from a leave of absence, and is currently working on the development of resiliency programming at the college.

You can learn more by visiting the Student Development and Outreach website, https://www.goucher.edu/experience/staying-healthy/case-management-and-student-support/

If you want to meet with Alexandra or Cameron, you can email us directly at care@goucher.edu

Welsh 205
Office of Accessibility Services Arnell Hadley

Best way to contact: email (access@goucher.edu or arnelle.hanley@goucher.edu ) or set up a Starfish appointment.

Office of Accessibility Services works with Goucher’s Counseling Services and Case Management Services.  Together we work to connect students to the appropriate resources on or off campus. Additionally, Arnelle frequently works with some student’s providers on creating accommodations that are appropriate for the various stages of their mental health. Her communication with the student and their provider is ongoing as things can change at any moment. Alumnae/i House 120
Office of Community-Based Learning (CBL) Santa Wallace sawallac@goucher.edu

Lindsay Johnson

lijohnso@goucher.edu

Cass Freedland

cassia.freedland@goucher.edu

The Office of Community-Based Learning (CBL) offers structured opportunities for engaging in community-based work, both through reflective volunteerism and classes that link their course content to off-campus community experiences. The connection between well-being and community engagement has received a great deal of scholarly attention; in fact, last year, Goucher’s CBL Office was part of a four-campus national study on well-being and thoughtful civic engagement. Studies have found that the work itself can be psychologically rewarding through connection with others in the community. In addition to this, when guided and reflected upon, community-based learning though volunteerism and classes can help to:

  • build one’s sense of a civic society
  • promote feelings of independence and freedom
  • encourage one to better understand one’s own privilege and identify power structures within colleges and communities,
  • and develop social connections that promote general well-being.

The Office of Community-Based Learning, in The Arsht Center for Ethics and Leadership, welcomes students to engage in one of our 8 volunteer programs, learn more about our Student Leaders for Civic Action program, or embrace the 30+ academic courses that incorporate community engagement each academic year.

Come to Van Meter 105 to talk and enjoy a cup of coffee or tea, or visit our website at https://www.goucher.edu/learn/beyond-the-classroom/community-based-learning/.
Title IX Office Lucia Perfetti Clark: lucia.perfetticlark@goucher.edu

and Peer Educators

The Office of Title IX connects students to short-term resources such as legal counsel and other victim services. Lucia oversees the sexual misconduct policy and the nondiscrimination policy. The Office only provides accommodations when a student requests them specifically, as each case they handle is unique.

Goucher Title IX: https://www.goucher.edu/title-ix/

ACE (Academic Center for Excellence) https://www.goucher.edu/learn/academic-support-and-resources/ace/request-an-appointment ACE provides self care sessions that include Sleep-Based meditation known as Yoga Nidra that supports the immune system and helps with restoring the mindbody and improves memory and retention.  Academic Coaching sessions with Peejo Sehr are centered around mind/body practices that address academic success from a holistic wellness lens. ACE offers holistic Academic Support and is not a mental health support provider. Our programs are focused primarily on stress management to support academic learning.

For more info: https://www.goucher.edu/learn/academic-support-and-resources/ace/

Julia Rogers Building, room 233
First Year Mentors First Year Mentors receive training about the transition to college and how that transition can impact mental health. In training, First Year Mentors talk in general about different situations involving mental health and how to refer students to the proper resources. Mentors help their group of first year students in their transition to college, and students can contact their First Year Mentor if they would like help figuring out where to go next.

Groups for students

RIO (Recognition, Insight, Openness) Tim Moslener (Counselor)

tim.moslener@goucher.edu

RIO stands for Recognition, Insight, Openness. The psychoeducation-based group is built around skill development and actively engaging in self-Reflection and learning. There are multiple sessions over the course of the semester, so there is always one about to open up again. Contact Tim Moslener for more information.
Meditation Group The Meditation Group meets weekly in the Chapel Undercroft, an excellent opportunity to learn and practice meditation. Chapel Undercroft
Student Bereavement Group Cynthia Terry

cynthia.terry@goucher.edu

Each semester, Cynthia Terry offers a Bereavement Group for students who are dealing with the loss of someone important to them. Chapel Undercroft

Events

Fresh Check Day Occurring in the fall semester, Fresh Check is a resources and activities fair with the goal of improving mental health through raising awareness of mental health challenges and providing resources with which to tackle those challenges. The event was developed and is supported by the JED Foundation, a national non-profit that works to promote emotional well-being and reduce the risk of suicide and serious substance abuse among young people.
Happiness Hunt Occurring in the spring semester, the Happiness Hunt is a multi-day campus wide group scavenger hunt involving the various offices associated with mental health resources.
Restore the Night Restore the Night is a weeklong campaign of events and workshops that intend to raise awareness, create a sense of solidarity, and ultimately work to put an end to sexual and gender-based violence. Past campaigns have included a resource fair, a masculinity workshop, an activism teach-in called “Know your Title IX,” and the creation of a zine featuring the voices of survivors.
Relaxation Stations The Office of Student Engagement (OSE) sponsors Relaxation Stations during finals week. The goal of Relaxation Stations is to offer some stress reduction activities during finals each semester as we know this is a high stress time.

Other

Kognito A self-directed avatar-based online training with specific tracks for students, faculty and staff. The training uses role play simulations of conversations to have participants try different approaches that they might use in real life and get feedback on those approaches. Made free to Maryland colleges through a statewide grant, the training is available to any interested student, faculty, or staff member at http://kognito.com/maryland. Peer Listeners and Resident Assistants have already completed the training.
Charm City Stories Intercollegiate Literary Journal for Mental and Physical Health On Friday, April 6th, Charm City Stories, Baltimore’s first student literary and art magazine of mental and physical health, released its first publication. Several Goucher students were published in the journal. The current team of Charm City Stories editors, consisting entirely of JHU students, hopes to have more students from other schools involved in editing the publication in future years. To read the publication online, visit charmcitystories.com. If you’re interested in applying for an editor position for next year, click here to fill out an application form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeV8pkhuw70NKOcwf_rL-jcQe-CIFfAuf3sSIrOTzwAHm_TZA/viewform
Commuter Student Lounge The lounge is open to commuter students to hang out and relax. Ath 147
Groups that have existed in the past Student Health Advisory Committee (SHAC): planned events, and tabled around issues such as eating disorders, sleep, and suicide prevention.

Mediation Group: Students were trained in mediation

Other student groups that may provide spaces to destress Outdoor club, Climbing Club (rock climbing), Cooking Club
 Resource Sheet Compiled by Neve Levinson and Madeline St. John

Featured Image from OneClass 

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